• COVID-19: Protect Hourly Workers from Losing their Jobs due to Sickness
    Hourly workers at the REI Co-Op are at great risk of facing termination should they call in sick during the novel Coronavirus pandemic. REI’s COVID-19 sick policy, revised on March 12, does little to protect its hourly assets from losing their jobs, should employees feel the need to call into work sick not knowing if they’ve contracted the virus or not. In fact, it offers workers so little protection, that there is cause for alarm that employees will be deterred from calling in sick, which could potentially place consumers and coworkers at risk. Most hourly workers at REI work part-time and are not eligible for healthcare or any real benefits. As a result, these employees are unable to afford the cost of seeing a doctor, or a visit to a nearby clinic for treatment, which further places their well-being, their livelihoods, and jobs at risk. Moreover, testing for COVID-19 remains inadequate in the United States. We are asking that REI members and all consumers stand together in support of protecting hourly workers from facing termination due to any company's sick policy, in a time when the novel Coronavirus has gripped our nation and the world with fear. REI is a leader in the outdoor industry and we are demanding that Mr. Artz, the CEO of REI, take the lead as REI’s Chief, to do more to protect its workers nationwide. Other companies will look to REI to see what policies it is implementing around COVID-19, so it is paramount that the policies REI is setting, be exemplary. Patagonia, another highly respected outdoor retailer, closed it stores and website operations at the day’s end on March 13, until further notice, to do its part in mitigating the spread of COVID-19, as well as to protect its workforce from contracting the virus. While operations are closed, all of Patagonia’s employees will receive pay. An extraordinary way for a company to live its values. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, and that it has now been declared a national emergency, it is not unreasonable for us to demand that REI do more to protect its loyal workforce. Until the novel Coronavirus has been contained, we are demanding that REI take these measures to protect hourly workers job security: 1) That all employees who call in sick be excused from work with pay, regardless whether they test positive for the virus. 2) That all sick time taken be excused, without employees having to use any of their accrued sick days or vacation time, retroactive to March 1st. 3) That all employees who are caring for sick family members (regardless if the illness is COVID-19 related), be excused from work with compensation, without having to use any of their accrued sick days or vacation time to cover their absence. 4) That all employees who are parents that need to stay home to take care of their children, due to schools or daycare closures because of COVID-19, be excused from work with compensation, without having to use any of their accrued sick days or vacation time to cover their absence. 5) That no doctors note be needed as proof of illness, because there are simply too many employees who cannot afford a visit to a doctor or clinic for testing. Moreover, accessibility to testing remains inadequate in the United States. 6) That the average weekly hours be preserved for all employees who call in sick, and whose benefits eligibility are determined by the hours they work. Currently, none of these measures are being implemented by REI, even though these were the words our CEO wrote to REI’s membership, in an email about COVID-19 and the actions that REI is taking; “We have modified our paid time off policies to ensure that our employees—including hourly retail employees—who miss work due to illness or to care for sick family members do not suffer loss of income or other benefits.” What this policy actually amounts to is shameful for a cooperative we all love and have grown so loyal to. "Mr. Artz, please revise this policy to reflect the true values of the REI Co-Op."
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  • City of Madison Workers Demand Coronavirus Protections
    With more cases of coronavirus reported in Wisconsin and Dane County, Governor Evers has declared a state of emergency. The University of Wisconsin has halted all in-person instruction; K-12 schools will close for the next four weeks; sports seasons have halted; and other public gatherings have been cancelled. What will happen with City workers? City of Madison employees have been encouraged to work from home and warned that any personal travel may result in quarantine for 14 days, which will be deducted from the employee’s sick or other leave time. For most City employees, there is no opportunity to work from home: bus drivers, firefighters, clerks, mechanics, parking attendants, and many others have jobs that must be physically present to perform. This means City employees must choose between coming to work sick or potentially losing income or our jobs. Regardless of City Agency, position or union, City workers have a common interest in making sure our employer handles this crisis properly and doesn’t place the burden on the shoulders of employees as we take care of ourselves and our families.
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    Created by Madison City Worker
  • Chili's: Provide Paid Sick Days!
    People who work at Chili's deserve paid sick days, especially with the rapid spreading of the coronavirus. As a large chain restaurant, Chili's unfortunately has a troubled history of public health issues, having been sued by customers for salmonella, food-poisoning, among other health-related lawsuits. This is an opportunity for Chili's to finally be on the right side of history by leading the industry along with Olive Garden on public health issues by providing paid sick days to their employees.
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    Created by ROC United Picture
  • Denny's: Provide Paid Sick Days
    People who work at Denny's deserve paid sick days, especially with the rapid spreading of the coronavirus. Denny's disproportionately serves the elderly population, meaning if their workforce contracts the coronavirus, the company has a higher likelihood of spreading the virus to those with weakened immune systems. This is a public health issue! Denny's do your part and follow Olive Garden's lead in providing paid sick days to your employees.
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  • IHOP & Applebee's: Provide Paid Sick Days!
    People at Applebee's deserve paid sick days, especially with the rapid spreading of the coronavirus. The parent company is one the largest in the restaurant industry, employing tens of thousands of people with locations all over America and abroad. A significant percentage of their restaurants are franchised with different policies and rules for each store. Corporate stepping in and requiring paid sick days at all franchised & corporate-owned locations is the quickest and most effective way to protect their employees and be a leader in helping curb the spread of the virus.
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  • Coronavirus: Whole Foods Workers Need Paid Sick Hours!
    Grocery workers around the country frequently work while sick as they can't afford to miss a single day of work because companies refuse to pay a living wage. This causes employees further suffering and exposes co-workers, food, and the public to potential infection. Jeff Bezos is the richest man on the planet and is more than able to provide an immediate expansion of Paid Sick Hours to protect Whole Foods employees and the public. Bezos has yet to provide his employees at Whole Foods with anything to cope with the recent outbreak. Bezos even had the audacity to cut healthcare benefits for nearly 2,000 Whole Foods employees at the beginning of the year. What Bezos makes in one day could cover a week of Paid Sick Time for all Whole Foods employees. Some co-workers at Amazon have already been told to work from home and other companies have even taken some appropriate action. Whole Foods needs to take this health crisis seriously and stop worrying about public perception and putting profits ahead of safety. We handle the food everyone consumes, push the shopping carts everyone touches, collect the baskets everyone carries, and count the cash everyone spends. It's time Whole Foods stops endangering its employees and the public. We need Paid Sick Hours NOW. Members of the public can call/email: Patrick Bradley, SOPAC Regional President: 818-501-8484 Rick Bonin, North Atlantic Regional President: [email protected] Scott Allshouses, Mid-Atlantic Regional President: [email protected] Omar Gaye, Northern California Regional President: 770-638-5884 Bill Jordan, Rocky Mountain Regional President: 818-501-8484 Angela Lorenzen, Pacific Northwest Regional President: 425-957-6700 Juan Nuñez, Florida Regional President: 954-489-2022 Matt Ray, Southwest Regional President: [email protected] David Schwartz, Midwest Region Regional President: 312-799-5637 Nicole Wescoe, Northeast Regional President: 301-984-2058 You can and should also call the Customer Service line at: 844-WFM-TALK (844-936-8255) and World Headquarters 512-477-4455 512-477-5566 - Voicemail 512-482-7000 - Fax Tell Whole Foods to take the safety of the public and ours seriously by demanding Jeff Bezos provide us with more Paid Sick Hours: In Solidarity, Whole Worker Organizing Committee
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  • Demand gig economy companies give paid sick time off during coronavirus
    Everyday, I have 20-30 people come into my car - with all their germs. While other workers who are exposed at work have things like paid time off and healthcare, I have no protection. Under recently passed legislation in California, gig companies are supposed to guarantee gig workers access to paid sick days, but the companies have refused to do so. Gig companies, like Uber, Lyft and DoorDash, irresponsibly deny their drivers basic protections like paid sick time off. Anyone can get sick from coronavirus, but because drivers like me don’t have paid sick time, I can’t go to the doctor or take time off without losing precious income. If I don’t work, I can’t afford my rent. My choices are either to continue working while sick, just so I can survive to the next week, or not work and fall behind on bills and rent. Drivers are always forced to choose between these two impossible options because Uber and Lyft shrug responsibility for ensuring everyone's safety. Even in the face of a global pandemic where the best protection we all have collectively is limiting exposure and ensuring access to the medical care we deserve, Uber and Lyft are doing what they have always done: creating unsafe and unfair conditions and leaving drivers with the responsibility and expense to deal with the repercussions. As a driver, my whole job is to keep people safe — to get my passengers from point A to point B safely. Right now, I am doing everything in my power to take safety precautions, like wiping down my car regularly, but it's not enough. All workers need and deserve paid time off and healthcare all of the time, but this pandemic shows that we need it especially right now, when our communities are at risk of infection. If these companies are not held accountable to take action immediately, they are putting drivers and all the riders we transport at risk. It’s a potential public health crisis, and companies like Uber and Lyft have a real and urgent responsibility to protect the health of society at large. - Yash A. Driver and leader with Gig Workers Rising
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    Created by Gig Workers Rising
  • COVID-19
    This issue of not informing Lyft drivers is vital because we are the ones at the so called front lines. We pick up passengers at the international airports that bring people from all over the world. We then go home to our families, and if our company that we work for does not take the initiative to put out vital precautions. We are left to fend for our selves to figure out how to protect our selves and still make a living.
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    Created by Pedro Rodriguez
  • Demand Work From Home
    While our staff are vaccinated and most are boosted, putting at less risk of hospitalization and death, many of our employees share homes and provide care to those most vulnerable to COVID: children too young to be vaccinated, elders, and immune-compromised loved ones.
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    Created by Breann Smith
  • Require Vaccination for Right Networks while In Person
    At Right Networks, a large part of our company culture revolves around in-person gatherings (the company outing, the Christmas party, and so on). While we're in a mixed-vaccination state, some employees haven't felt that it's safe enough to attend in-person events or return to the office even temporarily. Putting these rules in place would allow for future gatherings to be less likely to result in an outbreak, helping us to feel safer attending.
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    Created by Brenna Connolly
  • Unionize IYR 2021
    The only way our working conditions and wages will improve is if we all band together to tell our employers that they are not entitled to our labor until they treat us all much more fairly. Our current wages are barely enough to scrape by when considering that after taxes, there's still a struggle to cover rent, bills, groceries, vehicle maintenance, pets and any unexpected injuries or accidents. Our current working conditions are hostile almost daily, typically in the form of coworkers having disagreements and getting into screaming / yelling matches (often in front of donors and / or customers) that go largely unresolved by management; these disagreements also commonly end in "behind each other's backs" comments that often lead to further disagreements that, again, end in one of these two ways. When asked to help resolve many of these issues, management has commonly responded with some remark about or similar to being "unable" to do anything about it.
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  • 7-Eleven not allowing Tips
    In a time where a labor shortage has gone beyond anything an owner could imagine finding a great employer has become a tremendously difficult task. Our customers coupled with our management like our employees to feel special, appreciated, and rewarded. In numerous occasions our clientele has requested to tip employees, thus a tip jar should be permitted. A small jar can go a large way and can allow employees to feel supported and get a bit extra during such a difficult time.
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    Created by Noufel Aleem