• END THE HARM OF MASS REJECTIONS
    Workers behind AI, even invisible, still matter. Our stories have been neglected for years and it's our time to feel safer while doing our work in an unbalanced platform that only protects requester's voices. A victory for us is a victory for all workers. Petition FAQ 1. You may sign the petition with your first name and last initial. Full name is not required. 2. Working for Mturk and working on Mturk are the same thing for our purposes. 3. Email addresses will not be publicly displayed.
    398 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Turkopticon (TO)
  • Gig Workers Demand A Fair Deactivation Process
    People working in the gig economy, such as drivers for transportation giants like Uber and Lyft, face many challenges. They don’t receive any employee benefits or protections, and the work they do is also inherently dangerous. Drivers lose their lives in carjacking incidents, they have a high likelihood of being in an accident due to long hours on the road and they are often targeted by municipalities for expensive tickets. To add insult to injury, some of the most loyal, hardworking drivers can often find themselves out of a job due to unverified customer complaints. At the moment, if a customer complains about a driver to Uber or Lyft, even if there is no evidence that the claim is valid, drivers can be deactivated and have no ability to appeal or defend themselves against the allegation. Riders are incentivized to complain as they receive discounts if they say their driver did something wrong. There is no accountability or transparency in how these complaints are handled by the companies. This places thousands of workers and their families in financial hardship. Nationally, about 70% of Uber and Lyft drivers are BIPOC or immigrants, and poor labor standards further harm these already vulnerable populations, even while the City of Chicago and gig companies publicly claim to be working to improve conditions for these very people. These workers keep our city running every day, and made Uber and Lyft executives rich with their labor; they deserve a voice! Manminder Sethi, one of the original drivers in Milwaukee Wisconsin, started driving on Uber black first and later joined Uber X nearly 7 years ago. He had over 19000 rides and a rating of 4.93 when he was suddenly deactivated. When he tried to find out why, he was given reasons that ranged from unsafe driving to sexual harassment. Manminder has had no tickets related to unsafe driving, and he offered to provide the dash cam footage for the ride in question but Uber never responded to his requests. Chicago driver Mehrez Sahli, another long-time driver on the platform, started working with Uber Taxi first for a year or two, then also moved on to Uber X. He had 5,710 trips over 3.5 years on Uber X and a rating of 4.94 when he was suddenly deactivated. When he went to the Uber hub to ask why, he was told he was “manipulating” surge pricing by moving from a low surge area to a high surge area before accepting a ride. As this is the way the app is intended to work (surge pay is incentive to drive from a less busy area to a busy area) it is still unclear what the real reason for the deactivation was. However, in Mehrez’s case, not only was he deactivated from Uber, but Uber then also communicated something to the City of Chicago who then communicated that information to Lyft and he was summarily dismissed from Lyft as well. Typically, this is the process that would be followed if a driver were being deactivated for a serious offence such as assault or intoxication on the job, yet no such allegation has ever been communicated to Mehrez. Maurice Clark of Chicago was accused of falling asleep behind the wheel and was deactivated from Lyft with a driver rating of 4.98 and 5,734 rides under his belt. He has never had a ticket or been in an accident in relation to unsafe driving, and the details of the ride have been withheld from him. He was told by Lyft in an email that he was not permitted to “appeal or protest” the decision. Another Chicago driver, Hiep Can Tran, was deactivated from Uber due to an unspecified customer complaint after he completed 6,034 trips. He has called Uber repeatedly and visited the Uber hub but has never been told the details of the complaint. Hiep was supporting his small children using the money he made driving Uber and losing his income suddenly was a major financial hardship for him. He has been able to start driving for Lyft, but he has not been earning as much and still wants to know why he was deactivated from Uber. He maintains a 4.99 driver rating on Lyft at this time and has no tickets or accidents on his driving record. JC Muhammad of Chicago was deactivated due to a customer complaining that he was speeding after completing 3035 trips. He has received no tickets or warnings due to speed, and in fact believes that the complaint was made sarcastically as he typically drives the speed limit or under. Uber has offered no proof of the violation and again has denied JC the ability to defend himself or provide proof to the contrary.
    2,598 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Lori Simmons
  • Gig Workers Demand Occupational Death Benefits
    Over the course of the last year, gig workers have risked our health, our lives, and the safety of our families to provide essential services to our communities. Gig workers are intentionally misclassified as independent contractors by our employers, not just to cheat us out of earning minimum wage, but also to skip the tab for workers’ compensation, sick pay, employer-sponsored healthcare, paid family leave, and unemployment insurance. Throughout the pandemic, while risking our health, and our lives, gig companies (Uber, Lyft, Instacart, DoorDash and Postmates) spent an astonishing $205,000,000 to subvert our rights to proper classification, and they won. During a pandemic in which our labor was deemed essential, we were simultaneously stripped of even the most basic rights of employment. We've included stories of gig workers that lost their lives while working, leaving their families unprotected and utterly vulnerable. Lynn Murray, 62, was viciously gunned down in the mass shooting at King Soopers in Boulder, Colorado. https://www.denverpost.com/2021/03/23/boulder-shooting-victim-lynn-murray/. According to the Denver Post, Lynn, a beloved wife, and mother of two, was a former photo director who previously worked for big-name magazines like Glamour, Marie Claire, and Cosmopolitan. In her retirement, she was a gig worker who shopped for Instacart. She was brutally murdered while filling an Instacart order. Mohammad Anwar, 66, was fatally attacked in Washington, D.C. Mohammad was a father of three and grandfather of four and was violently murdered while delivering an order for UberEats. https://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/two-girls-13-and-15-used-stun-gun-in-fatal-armed-carjacking-near-nationals-park-police-say/2617947/  Ryan Munsie Graham, 31, was murdered while delivering for UberEats in Haltom City, Texas. Ryan left behind a husband and three small children. https://kvia.com/news/texas/2021/01/30/texas-mom-of-3-working-side-job-as-uber-eats-driver-allegedly-killed-by-14-year-old-boys/ Timothy Allen, 65, murdered while delivering packages for Amazon Flex in West Dallas, Texas. Timothy was an extremely talented musician. https://www.fox4news.com/news/trackdown-help-identify-persons-of-interest-in-timothy-allens-murder Yusuf Ozgur, 56, was a treasured husband and father of two. Yusuf was murdered while picking up an order for DoorDash in Manassas, Virginia. https://people.com/crime/doordash-delivery-man-killed-christmas-robbery-dennys/ Cherno Ceesay, 28, was robbed and murdered while driving for Uber in Issaquah, Washington. https://www.q13fox.com/news/couple-accused-of-stabbing-killing-uber-driver-in-issaquah Yousef Al-Gabri, 56, was murdered in Detroit, Michigan, after picking up a passenger for Uber. Yousef is survived by his four children. https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/local/2021/03/12/detroit-man-charged-with-1st-degree-murder-in-shooting-death-of-uber-driver/ When Instacart Shopper, Lynn Murray, was killed in the mass shooting at King Soopers in Boulder, CO, while filling an Instacart order, her family did not receive the same benefits that were extended to grocery store workers that were killed during the massacre. If Lynn were properly classified as an employee, her family would receive occupational death benefits that all Colorado employees are entitled to like survivor benefits and funeral benefits. She would have also qualified for life insurance, which Instacart offers to its properly classified employees. Even in the most extreme cases, gig companies have demonstrated that they won’t properly step up to honor the rights and protections afforded to properly classified workers. Gig work is dangerous work. Even before the pandemic, “Uber and Lyft drivers face fatal risks that are 1.1 and 2.6 times the fatality rate for police officers and firefighters. The corresponding estimates for Grubhub are 2.0 and 4.4.” https://www.sfchronicle.com/opinion/openforum/amp/Open-Forum-Driving-for-Uber-Lyft-GrubHub-and-14123731.php Undoubtedly, as gig workers were declared essential workers and still expected to show up, overwhelmingly unprotected, the pandemic has only added insult to injury. With our occupational risks of death being higher than first responders, there is no doubt that we need the full host of occupational injury and death protections provided through workers’ compensation.  When gig workers die at work we die without security, and often our families must rely on the generosity of strangers and crowdfunding to even cover funeral expenses. Due to the high-profile nature of Lynn Murray’s brutal murder, Instacart publicly donated $50,000 to a GoFundMe for her family. Gig companies pocket hundreds of millions of dollars they should have paid annually into state-run workers’ compensation programs. Any token donations to families are always a fraction of a cent on the dollar of what they should be paying to ensure workers are protected in our workplaces. Make no mistake, a company that deprives its workers of essential workplace protections through intentional misclassification deserves no accolades for a one-time donation to a single-family. We need the security of guaranteed benefits, crowdsourcing is not a safety net. What happens when the death of a gig worker is not part of national headlines? What is the recourse for grieving families when they’re left to seek damages from some of the wealthiest and most resourced corporations in the nation?  The answer is infuriating. Families are left to fend for themselves in addition to the trauma and grief of unexpectedly losing a family member. We encourage you to read more about gig workers that have lost their lives while working and remember that they represent only a fraction of the actual human cost of gig work.
    2,843 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Vanessa Bain
  • Amazon Drivers demand better working conditions
    We work long, tiresome hours for Amazon. Our work generates billions of dollars in revenue for this corporation. We are valuable and essential to this company and we demand to be treated with respect.
    5,263 of 6,000 Signatures
    Created by Anthony B
  • DoorDash: Publicly Commit to Paying Dashers a Living Wage
    As a dasher, you pay for your own gas, upkeep on your vehicles, and you are not paid for time spent waiting for a pickup. The CEOs of the companies you work for are mega-rich, but you are not afforded basic benefits such as health care or paid time off. And while prices have increased for customers through vague service fees to cover substandard benefits, much of that money will never make it into the hands of workers. Under the new law in California, delivery workers of DoorDash will receive almost half of the IRS rate for mileage, only .30/mile. No matter where you come from, the color of your skin, or the work that you do, a job should help you pay the bills and leave you time with your family. In exchange for your time and effort, you should earn the pay and benefits that provide for a good living and a bright future. Working via an app and setting your own hours shouldn’t mean making pennies and having no safety net if you get sick or injured. It doesn’t have to be this way. A company worth almost $3 billion is able to pay you a living wage - they are just choosing not to. DoorDash drivers deserve better pay. Sign if you agree.
    4,094 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Gig Workers Rising
  • Pay minimum wage for food food runnners
    They make less than a server and do all the servers work for them. It’s not equal pay. And can’t live off 2.83 an hour.
    6 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Jess J
  • Gig Workers MUST Be Included In Vaccine Priority List
    Gig workers ARE essential workers. Gig workers are the people who drive passengers for companies like Uber and who deliver food for companies like Doordash and Instacart. They have provided many of us with services we’ve relied on in order to safely shelter in place during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is for this exact reason that many states list gig workers as “essential workers”. As the COVID-19 vaccine is distributed, it is imperative that the Center for Disease Control include gig workers in their Phase 1b recommendation for vaccine distribution for “Frontline essential workers”. At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, gig corporations were quick to petition that their workers be classified as essential, while refusing to provide them with personal protective equipment or healthcare. The people who drive for ride hailing companies and deliver our food and groceries safely to our homes, have been forced to spend the last ten months exposing themselves to a deadly virus in order to keep food on the table and a roof over their heads. Despite this, many state governors have failed to include gig workers in vaccine roll out efforts. In New York, Governor Andrew Cuomo excluded rideshare drivers and food delivery workers from the next phase of the state’s vaccine rollout. This is unacceptable and dangerous for both workers and consumers alike. The CDC must properly prioritize gig workers as essential workers in vaccine roll out plans across the country. Many gig workers have had no choice but to continue working or return to work during a deadly pandemic because the platform corporations they work for have unilaterally abandoned them. These corporations have refused to pay a dime into state unemployment funds and have actively advocated that their workers be excluded from state unemployment benefits, all while denying them access to crucial benefits like health insurance, paid sick leave and proper protective equipment. The majority of gig workers in the United States are Black or Brown, representing the communities hardest hit by the pandemic while receiving the least amount of protection and support. It is crucial that the CDC’s vaccine plan includes gig workers as essential workers. We demand that the Center for Disease Control include gig workers in their Phase 1b recommendations for vaccine distribution for “Frontline essential workers”.
    3,584 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Gig Workers Rising
  • Extend Unemployment Payments & Ensure Overpayment Relief for Gig Workers
    More than 7.3 million gig workers, independent contractors, and self-employed workers will see their unemployment benefits cut on December 26 if the government doesn’t act. Millions of people who work for gig companies, such as Uber and Lyft drivers, were directed to apply for unemployment benefits through the federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program when the COVID-19 pandemic began. Only some have been able to access state unemployment benefits. In any event, these benefits were—and continue to be—extremely meager. The average payment given to workers is between $114 and $357 a week—below the poverty line in most states. Now, some people who were directed to apply for PUA are even being notified that they have been overpaid and may be responsible for returning the overpaid amount . This is not only unrealistic, it is inhumane. Many gig workers are behind on rent and struggling to keep food on the table, and do not have extra cash on hand to return to the state. While drivers, couriers, and shoppers are struggling to stay safe and pay their bills, gig corporations have gotten richer and have not paid a dime into state unemployment insurance funds. For example, through misclassifying their workers, Uber and Lyft avoided paying a total of $413 million into California’s unemployment insurance fund between 2014 and 2019. Sign on today and stand with gig workers who are demanding an extension on their benefits and relief for any overpayment.
    668 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Gig Workers Rising
  • Increase base pay & offer hazard pay to gig workers. Company profits must be transparent.
    No one should profit from the pandemic. Since the start of the pandemic all incentives and bonuses that had been offered regularly prior to the virus disappeared while business for these companies dramatically increased. These companies should not be allowed to exploit workers by consistently excusing themselves from any responsibility to these workers via the "independent contractor" classification.
    5 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Xio Vargas
  • Give Sex Workers a Voice on OnlyFans!
    Since the Covid-19 pandemic, many sex workers have relied heavily on OnlyFans to make a living, and in so doing, have helped to accelerate the growth of the platform and increase the profits of the company overall. In response to this surge in growth and some of the complications that have come with it, the platform has introduced new policies that have hurt these workers’ ability to make the money they need to survive, thus compromising their quality of life. The recent decision to lower the amount of money creators can receive via tips and pay-to-view messages has resulted in lost income for many. OnlyFans has also failed to address existing issues, such as the discrimination its creators face on other platforms, which limits their ability to self-promote. While sex workers do not account for the whole of OnlyFans’ creator base, they constitute a significant presence on the platform and notably played a meaningful role in launching the platform into the public consciousness. Unfortunately, due to societal stigma, they are also a uniquely vulnerable population--and this stigma is further compounded for BIPOC and trans workers, who are disproportionately impacted by policies that hinder their ability to work. We believe that as long as OnlyFans continues to profit off the labor of these creators, the company also has a responsibility to protect them and to craft its policies in ways that do not disproportionately penalize, censor, or otherwise interfere with their ability to work and survive.
    1,444 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Avery Mauel
  • Shipt: Resolve Tip Issues and End Ongoing Wage Theft
    Shoppers are dedicated to providing the high-quality service that our customers expect and work hard to earn tips to supplement our modest base wages. For months, we have experienced issues with tipping that Shipt has failed to take seriously or rectify. Shoppers have reported tips they receive that are not paid out, or are submitted by customers but not collected and paid to the shopper. When we bring these issues to Shipt’s attention, we are almost always treated as though we are lying or trying to receive compensation we don’t deserve. We are ignored and forced to jump through hoops to ensure we receive the proper pay. Tips are a fundamental part of Shipt’s pay structure, and should be treated as such. For months, customers have expressed concerns when placing orders on certain devices, especially through Target’s website, they are not even given the opportunity to tip. As we put their health on the line to deliver essential items during a global pandemic, Shipt should do more to ensure all customers have the opportunity to tip, and that they are encouraged to do so at a level that is in line with industry standards. Too frequently, we go the extra mile for customers who are not properly informed (by Shipt) about how tipping works and when it is expected. We understand that mistakes happen, and for that reason we believe there should be a standardized and transparent process for reporting missing tips. Shipt should work to create a process in which shoppers can audit their tips, identify discrepancies, and report them to the company, without being left in the dark, ignored, or treated with suspicion. As an app-based company, Shipt bears full responsibility for the app’s functionality. Whether by design or in error, when shoppers are not paid the amount they rightfully earn, this is a form of wage theft.
    756 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Concerned, Shipt Shoppers
  • Lovestruck Game Writers Deserve Fair Pay!
    All of the Lovestruck writers are members of marginalized genders and/or sexualities. Voltage has given us an invaluable foot in the door to the industry and a platform to tell stories that represent our voices, our passion, and our experiences. We are also all fans of the app, and we care deeply about the stories we tell. We don't want this to be the end of our partnership with Lovestruck, nor does it have to be. However, the conditions under which we are currently working are untenable. Not only are we paid less than half the industry standard in both base pay and our raises, we are not provided with information about how the routes we write perform either. The increased base pay that Voltage is currently offering is still well below the industry standard. We are eager to have an open and honest conversation with management in order to work together to settle on an equitable rate. The ultimate goal of the contract writers of Lovestruck is to see our hard work and commitment to authentic storytelling given the value it deserves, which will allow us to continue to provide loyal Lovestruck fans with the top-notch content they deserve. We've seen the support for our request for equitable pay and improved conditions come pouring in across social media, and it means the world to us. We cannot thank you enough! By signing this petition, you add your voice to the chorus of Lovestruck fans, game workers, romance writers, organizations, and more in inviting Voltage executives to hop on a call with us to discuss these matters. Thanks again for your incredible support! 🖤🤎❤️🧡💛💚💙💜
    4,142 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Voltage Writers Picture