• Give Sex Workers a Voice on OnlyFans!
    Since the Covid-19 pandemic, many sex workers have relied heavily on OnlyFans to make a living, and in so doing, have helped to accelerate the growth of the platform and increase the profits of the company overall. In response to this surge in growth and some of the complications that have come with it, the platform has introduced new policies that have hurt these workers’ ability to make the money they need to survive, thus compromising their quality of life. The recent decision to lower the amount of money creators can receive via tips and pay-to-view messages has resulted in lost income for many. OnlyFans has also failed to address existing issues, such as the discrimination its creators face on other platforms, which limits their ability to self-promote. While sex workers do not account for the whole of OnlyFans’ creator base, they constitute a significant presence on the platform and notably played a meaningful role in launching the platform into the public consciousness. Unfortunately, due to societal stigma, they are also a uniquely vulnerable population--and this stigma is further compounded for BIPOC and trans workers, who are disproportionately impacted by policies that hinder their ability to work. We believe that as long as OnlyFans continues to profit off the labor of these creators, the company also has a responsibility to protect them and to craft its policies in ways that do not disproportionately penalize, censor, or otherwise interfere with their ability to work and survive.
    1,262 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Avery Mauel
  • Shipt: Resolve Tip Issues and End Ongoing Wage Theft
    Shoppers are dedicated to providing the high-quality service that our customers expect and work hard to earn tips to supplement our modest base wages. For months, we have experienced issues with tipping that Shipt has failed to take seriously or rectify. Shoppers have reported tips they receive that are not paid out, or are submitted by customers but not collected and paid to the shopper. When we bring these issues to Shipt’s attention, we are almost always treated as though we are lying or trying to receive compensation we don’t deserve. We are ignored and forced to jump through hoops to ensure we receive the proper pay. Tips are a fundamental part of Shipt’s pay structure, and should be treated as such. For months, customers have expressed concerns when placing orders on certain devices, especially through Target’s website, they are not even given the opportunity to tip. As we put their health on the line to deliver essential items during a global pandemic, Shipt should do more to ensure all customers have the opportunity to tip, and that they are encouraged to do so at a level that is in line with industry standards. Too frequently, we go the extra mile for customers who are not properly informed (by Shipt) about how tipping works and when it is expected. We understand that mistakes happen, and for that reason we believe there should be a standardized and transparent process for reporting missing tips. Shipt should work to create a process in which shoppers can audit their tips, identify discrepancies, and report them to the company, without being left in the dark, ignored, or treated with suspicion. As an app-based company, Shipt bears full responsibility for the app’s functionality. Whether by design or in error, when shoppers are not paid the amount they rightfully earn, this is a form of wage theft.
    478 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Concerned, Shipt Shoppers
  • Lovestruck Game Writers Deserve Fair Pay!
    All of the Lovestruck writers are members of marginalized genders and/or sexualities. Voltage has given us an invaluable foot in the door to the industry and a platform to tell stories that represent our voices, our passion, and our experiences. We are also all fans of the app, and we care deeply about the stories we tell. We don't want this to be the end of our partnership with Lovestruck, nor does it have to be. However, the conditions under which we are currently working are untenable. Not only are we paid less than half the industry standard in both base pay and our raises, we are not provided with information about how the routes we write perform either. The increased base pay that Voltage is currently offering is still well below the industry standard. We are eager to have an open and honest conversation with management in order to work together to settle on an equitable rate. The ultimate goal of the contract writers of Lovestruck is to see our hard work and commitment to authentic storytelling given the value it deserves, which will allow us to continue to provide loyal Lovestruck fans with the top-notch content they deserve. We've seen the support for our request for equitable pay and improved conditions come pouring in across social media, and it means the world to us. We cannot thank you enough! By signing this petition, you add your voice to the chorus of Lovestruck fans, game workers, romance writers, organizations, and more in inviting Voltage executives to hop on a call with us to discuss these matters. Thanks again for your incredible support! 🖤🤎❤️🧡💛💚💙💜
    4,135 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Voltage Writers Picture
  • Say the words! Solidarity means saying "Black Lives Matter"
    Recently Whole Foods workers have been sent home for wearing Black Lives Matter paraphernalia at work, on the grounds that they are somehow controversial. Respectfully, we beg to differ. As an Amazon employee, and a Black American descendant of enslaved peoples in this country, I must say, that anyone who believes that the words Black Lives Matter, are controversial suffers from an unfortunate delusional state induced by years of conditioning in white supremacist ideology. Workers should not be forced to choose between earning a living, and asserting that the lives of other human beings have value. Whole Foods is wholly wrong to have ever enforced this policy. Nothing short of a full throated apology and a sincere commitment to sit down, shut up, and LISTEN to us, will do at this point. This is not a request. It is a demand. Words have meaning, and you can't claim to be in solidarity with the Black community, and then show the reckless indifference to Black and Latinx lives that Amazon is demonstrating currently. While you're here sign our petition to shut down DSF4 for deep cleaning. We've had 3 confirmed cases of COVID 19 reported in the last month and management is lax about enforcing social distancing unless it's to get rid of an organizers like Hibaq Mohamed or myself. Workers should not be retaliated against for speaking up for the safety of themselves and their colleagues. Standing in solidarity in the fight against systemic racism and injustice means being willing to say that Black Lives Matter AND act on that truth by treating Black employees with the dignity and respect that we deserve.
    505 of 600 Signatures
    Created by John Hopkins
  • ESS (Source4Teachers) must be held accountable
    Because of their classification of us, we do not qualify for regular unemployment benefits. We're not given the same benefits, we're not given the same paid time off, we're not even allowed in the union - at least not the way my district negotiated ESS's contract, I can imagine this is true elsewhere. It's ludicrous that I could work alongside district hired employees who have Union representatives to be their voice & hold the school accountable during this very uncertain time. Subcontracting teacher's aides, especially special education ones, like me, is bad for students, staff & the reputation of the school. It also entirely disenfranchises aspiring educators, like myself, who took a permanent position with a school to fund my way to teacher certification. Now, why would I even bother....? I'm sure many are in my position & that needs to change now for the future of education. Forbes named them a best largest employer for 3 years in a row, at the very least that needs to stop.
    3 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Brittany Coughlin
  • Tell Target: Shipt shoppers need paid leave, too.
    Target’s grocery delivery service, Shipt, is more popular than ever. Demand is so high the company has hired tens of thousands more “shoppers” to shop for and deliver orders to Target customers in the past few months. The delivery service has become a major driver of Target’s increased revenue during the pandemic. But Shipt’s 100,000+ shoppers don’t have access to the same paid family and medical leave benefits that other Target employees have. If they get sick, or need to care for a family member, they’re on their own. And the pay is so low, many Shipt shoppers can’t afford to take time off without paid leave--even if it puts their health and their families at risk. In fact, most Target store employees get up to 150 days of paid medical leave, and 4 weeks of family caregiving leave--but the Shipt shoppers who deliver the products to our homes don’t get any. Shipt shoppers are working side by side with Target store employees, serving Target customers, in Target stores--but don’t have access to the same paid leave to support themselves and their families. Target--which is one of the largest retailers in the country--can afford to protect EVERYONE who works in its stores as well as its customers during this pandemic. That’s why Shipt shoppers are coming together to demand that Target provide paid leave to EVERYONE who works in its stores. Will you sign the petition?
    3,788 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by PL+US: Paid Leave for the U.S.
  • Uber: Stop Slowing Down Unemployment for New York Drivers and Stop Lying To Us About Our Rights!
    Today, as the COVID19 crisis rages through New York, Uber drivers, like many other gig workers, face unprecedented health risks and total financial ruin. At a moment of such crisis, Uber's actions are designed to confuse drivers about our immediate right to access NYS unemployment insurance and to obstruct quick delivery of those benefits. Uber drivers are eligible for unemployment benefits in New York State RIGHT NOW. Three Uber driver members of the New York Taxi Workers Alliance and all “similarly employed” drivers in New York State won the right to unemployment benefits in a final ruling in 2018. Uber did not appeal this ruling and it is now final. Additionally, an upstate Uber driver, and all similarly employed upstate drivers have been found to be employees with a right to the state's unemployment insurance benefits. Since then, Uber drivers in New York State have applied for, and been paid out unemployment benefits. Yet, Uber has failed to provide the New York State Department of Labor with the wage data necessary to process driver claims quickly, heartlessly delaying payouts that drivers need to feed our families in a time of crisis. A recent New York State Court of Appeals decision found Postmates to be an employer, as well. Uber knows its misclassification game is over. Uber needs to follow the law and start reporting its drivers' wages to NYS immediately. But Uber continues to mislead drivers, telling us we need to wait for the federal pandemic unemployment assistance program to go into effect. That is a lie. Any delay in benefits during this pandemic could be a matter of life and death for Uber drivers whose incomes have been decimated. We demand that Uber stop misleading drivers, inform all New York State drivers of our right to state unemployment benefits, and that Uber cooperate with the New York Department of Labor so that drivers can immediately receive the benefits we need to survive this crisis. Photo credit: Spencer Platt / Getty Images
    2,637 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Amara Sanogo, Mehedi Hasan, and Zakir Ahmed
  • Provide Shipt Shoppers with Hazard Pay and Expand COVID-19 Paid Leave
    Target-owned Shipt, a delivery service, is currently hiring thousands of new shoppers in cities across the United States to meet the rising demand for home delivery of essential goods during this crisis. Shipt workers shop for and deliver groceries, medications and household supplies from local retailers. During this global crisis, we shoppers are working on the frontlines and risking our safety. The current policy--providing 14 days of financial assistance to those who test positive for COVID-19--isn't enough. In many cases, access to tests is limited or unavailable. Shoppers may need to be--and some already are--under self-quarantine due to exposure to COVID-19 or due to a sick or at-risk family member. Shoppers need expanded paid leave to provide us with the crucial support needed to make the safest decisions for ourselves, for Shipt customers, and for the community at large. Many Shipt customers are high risk populations--elderly, immunocompromised, and those with underlying medical conditions. It is imperative that Shipt shoppers have the support that they need to make safe, informed decisions that keep everyone as safe as possible. Grocery store retailers--including Trader Joe's and H-E-B--have begun making movements in this direction, implementing hourly pay raises, expanding paid leave, and introducing new safety protocols. On March 20th, Target, Shipt's parent company, increased wages, provided bonuses to team leads, and extended paid leave for higher-risk Target employees. With more and more shelter-in-place orders being enacted around the country, our work is vital. Shipt workers must not be left behind. **To any Shipt shopper who wants to join in this effort, you're invited to The Shipt List, a facebook community for Shipt shoppers.
    4,636 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Anonymous .
  • Demand gig economy companies give paid sick time off during coronavirus
    Everyday, I have 20-30 people come into my car - with all their germs. While other workers who are exposed at work have things like paid time off and healthcare, I have no protection. Under recently passed legislation in California, gig companies are supposed to guarantee gig workers access to paid sick days, but the companies have refused to do so. Gig companies, like Uber, Lyft and DoorDash, irresponsibly deny their drivers basic protections like paid sick time off. Anyone can get sick from coronavirus, but because drivers like me don’t have paid sick time, I can’t go to the doctor or take time off without losing precious income. If I don’t work, I can’t afford my rent. My choices are either to continue working while sick, just so I can survive to the next week, or not work and fall behind on bills and rent. Drivers are always forced to choose between these two impossible options because Uber and Lyft shrug responsibility for ensuring everyone's safety. Even in the face of a global pandemic where the best protection we all have collectively is limiting exposure and ensuring access to the medical care we deserve, Uber and Lyft are doing what they have always done: creating unsafe and unfair conditions and leaving drivers with the responsibility and expense to deal with the repercussions. As a driver, my whole job is to keep people safe — to get my passengers from point A to point B safely. Right now, I am doing everything in my power to take safety precautions, like wiping down my car regularly, but it's not enough. All workers need and deserve paid time off and healthcare all of the time, but this pandemic shows that we need it especially right now, when our communities are at risk of infection. If these companies are not held accountable to take action immediately, they are putting drivers and all the riders we transport at risk. It’s a potential public health crisis, and companies like Uber and Lyft have a real and urgent responsibility to protect the health of society at large. - Yash A. Driver and leader with Gig Workers Rising
    1,754 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Gig Workers Rising
  • Treat Luggers with Dignity and Respect
    We are a group of Luggers who want to help Lugg become a better workplace: Happy Luggers, happy customers, happy investors. Luggers are the marketers, ambassadors, and promoters of your company. We interphase with customers all day, and we want to do a good job every time. We are professional and hard workers. However, Lugg makes our lives unnecessarily miserable every day at work. Drivers and helpers sometimes get deactivated without knowing why, and Lugg has a practice of cancelling work shifts as punishment. When we ask for clarification, we get ignored, scolded, and belittled. We take working at Lugg seriously, and we are willing to put in all the energy and endless hours because we need the job, it is a main source of income for us and our families. When we are deactivated, we fall behind on our bills, and it hurts our livelihood, which is demoralizing. We invest so much of our time to working for Lugg, that we give up on other jobs, and other opportunities for making income. Sometimes there are no jobs provided during our scheduled shifts with Lugg, and we end up having to be on-call, waiting for jobs that never come, without pay. If we request to clock-out while waiting, we are told that we are the only crew available, and that we need to stop spamming with our request. If we insist, we get ignored. We don’t want to clock-out, we want to work, we need income! But we fear being kicked out of the platform for asking Lugg to free-up our time when they don’t give us work. Lugg has a policy of cancelling all future shifts as punishment for pausing or stopping work with no consideration for the circumstances, if we don’t do it 24 hours in advance. One Lugger had a family member in the hospital fighting for life, and needed to attend this emergency, so he notified Lugg asking to get the rest of that day off. Lugg deleted all future shifts and restricted him from scheduling work for a week, leaving him with no income in the middle of his medical emergency. Another Lugger suffered a small accident while on-the-job, hurting his foot. He finished his shift with his foot hurt, and asked Lugg for a couple days off to recover, but Lugg cancelled all of his future shifts as punishment, anyway. We have to beg Lugg for a couple minutes to use the bathroom or take a break, as they are tracking us at every moment and every place where we are. We always work in pairs. Customers are only able to review both workers together with the same ranking applying to both, even if one may have performed better or worse than the other. This ranking affects our opportunity for higher pay and better shifts. Lugg assigns work shifts based on a priority system. Workers with Priority 1 get the first pick on shifts and a higher pay. To escalate from priority 3 to 2 to 1, a worker must maintain a high customer ranking individually, but the ranking affects both Luggers. Our lives are full of uncertainty, not knowing when Lugg may terminate us on a whim, or when we may get a negative review because of someone else’s performance, and lose our job. We suffer high levels of stress, with no health insurance. Many of us are responsible for our children’s future. Jordan Brown, Lugg CEO, as a new parent would understand the importance of steady income to support our kids. We have to pay rent, take care of ourselves. We are very frustrated but we want to make it work. If these things are fixed, the quality of our lives can improve, and our happiness will increase: Happy Luggers, happy customers, happy investors. Whether you are a driver, a helper, a customer, or a member of the community, we invite you to support our effort to demand that Lugg improves the way it treats its workers. Thank you!
    2,866 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Luggers Make a Move
  • Uber: Give Drivers Their Fair Share
    My name is Mostafa Maklad and I have been an Uber driver since 2014. I’ve given 8,000 rides, usually driving between 50-60 hours a week — though sometimes it’s 80. The living hourly wage — the amount of money one needs to earn to afford housing, food, medical care and transportation — is about $20 for a single adult in San Francisco; I routinely make half that. Because of this, I joined the international Uber Shut Down on May 8th. Together, drivers made history. Rideshare drivers in six countries across the world organized a global day of action protesting Uber's IPO. In the U.S., over 10 cities joined in including Philadelphia, Boston, Atlanta, Chicago, New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. Drivers in every city stood together to call on Uber to pay us a living wage and treat us with dignity and respect. Uber drivers provide services that so many rely on every day to move through their lives — rides to school, work, medical appointments, social events and safe passage back home. As drivers, we pour ourselves into our work, doing one of the most dangerous jobs in our society to ensure that every passenger arrives safely at their destination. But Uber excludes us from basic worker protections. Without these protections, we face low wages and labor abuses. We have no way to organize and Uber denies us crucial benefits like health insurance, disability, overtime or workers comp. We face unsafe working conditions and have no recourse when we're deactivated. Drivers take all the risk, executives get all the reward. But now, we are calling on Uber to give us our fair share: - Living wage: Uber must pay drivers a livable hourly rate (after expenses). - Transparency: Clear policies on wages, tips, fare breakdowns and deactivations. - Benefits: Such as disability, workers comp, retirement, health care, death benefits, and paid time off. - Voice at work: A recognized independent worker organization, the freedom to stand together without fear of retaliation and a fair and transparent process for deactivations. Sign on now to stand with drivers!
    1,509 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Gig Workers Rising
  • Instacart: Here's our 22 cents — no more tip theft, low pay, and black-box pay algorithms
    We are Instacart workers. Some of us work buying and delivering groceries full-time, and some of us work part-time. Some have been on the platform for just a few months, and some for years. But since November, all of us have seen dramatic cuts in our paychecks. Some of us have seen wages lowered by 30-40% overall. Some of us have had to work twice as many hours just to make ends meet. Now, we’re speaking out to demand that Instacart address these issues by agreeing to a predictable, transparent pay structure. Until Instacart implements these changes, we're asking that customers tip just 22 cents up front in the app (then add your tip after delivery or tip in cash) to show that you support workers. Instacart has changed their pay structure from a predictable system where we knew what each gig would pay and why to a new model where it seems they pay as little as they’re able to get away with, and even use customer tips to get away with paying us less. This means they're offering very low wages that can even fall under the equivalent of the minimum wage. The company claims their new model is more "transparent," but in reality, the new model gives no indication of how pay is actually determined. The pay per job is now inexplicable — and much lower. Under the old model, shoppers were paid a specific base rate per delivery (e.g. $9.25 in Tacoma) and then an item incentive (40 cents per item we picked up). Under the new model, there’s no breakdown of how pay is determined. Shoppers often reject jobs only to see the same jobs re-appear minutes later with slightly higher pay, indicating that Instacart is simply trying to sell the job to the lowest bidder with no other obvious standard for how a given job should be paid. ***THE INSTACART TIP PENALTY*** Instacart is also practicing a sneaky form of tip theft by using customers' tips to subsidize their own costs instead of passing those tips directly on to the workers. Under the new model, Instacart pays less to workers for gigs where customers have left higher tips, so customers' tips are essentially being paid to Instacart rather than to the workers ourselves. If customers don't tip up front, Instacart pays more. This essentially works like a tip penalty, where instead of being "extra," tips are just used to make up for not paying workers decently in the first place. Using tips to subsidize Instacart's costs hurts workers and customers alike. Led by Instacart workers of Washington state: Mia Kelly (Seattle); Corrinne Pettitt (Tacoma); Ashley Knudson (Tacoma); Phoenix Di Corvo (Bremerton); Mark Moran (Seattle); Lori Tripp (Gig Harbor); Hannah Leighton (Bellingham); Ryan Munsell (Lynnwood); Samantha C. Sanabria (Tacoma); Terri Harstad (Bremerton); Julia Mascarella (Seattle); John LeMaster (Lakewood); Austin S. (Bellingham); Josh Siliaga (Seattle); Theresa Herstad (Bremerton); Renee Cable (Federal Way); Kris Sanderson (Mountlake Terrace); Patricia M. (Montesano); Rick Flickenger (Seattle); Rachel Jenkins (Vancouver); Ethan Bendorf (Port Orchard); Caitlin Santos (Steilacoom); April Cipriano (Tacoma); Rhonda Kirkes (Spanaway); Janssen Sartiga (Seattle); Jackie H. (Shoreline); Jaimee S. (Des Moines); Deanna Brewer (Seattle); Dawn Sabatella-Burnam; Jessica Habbe (Seattle); Jessica Clark (Edmonds); Anna Butler (Kent); Eva Skillings (Vancouver); Kristin Klatkiewicz (Kent); Martina B. (Lake Stevens); Michelle Padilla (Marysville); Jamilyn Salas (Tacoma); Alviena Ross (Olympia); Rachel Ross (Spokane); Chelsea Ward (Spokane); Lee Holland (Kent); Angela Sumers (Tacoma); Andrew Lincicome (Monroe); Bryan Sanford (Snohomish)
    404 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Working Washington Picture