• Social distancing at Vons and protection for employees
    Due to covid-19 outbreak big chains like Ralph’s and Costco are allowing a certain amount of customers at a time it’s safe for everyone and we want a safe environment for everyone during this crisis as the president said we need to practice social distancing before it’s too late
    19 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Marissa Hernandez
  • Tropical smoothie cafe Hazard pay covid 19
    Lives are at risk several customers come in every day not knowing if they’re sick due to the shortage on test even though there is no dining in the store there still are small crowds in small lines that form During orders some of them have already displayed signs of sickness , hazard pay Would be at the very least since we are not offered sick day leave
    16 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Dakoda Mandujano
  • DCH1 Amazonians United Petition for Equal PTO & Meeting with Daniel Reyes
    Amazon is treating delivery station warehouse workers like second-class employees. We work hard & put our bodies on the line to rush packages out to customers in 1 day, make Amazon one of the biggest companies in the world, and make Jeff Bezos the wealthiest man in the world. But we are not given the same Paid Time Off benefits that are provided to other part-time employees. In February, DCH1 Amazonians United collected and submitted a petition demanding 1) equality with other Amazon Part-Time Associates who receive PTO and Paid Vacation Time, and 2) a meeting between DCH1 Amazonians United and Daniel Reyes our regional manager, to address this concern. We submitted our petition with 250 signatures from DCH1 workers to our site lead Domonic Wilkerson- he told us that he met with Daniel Reyes, they reviewed our petition, and that they were not going to meet with us. Amazon claims to have an open door policy, but when 250 associates ask for a meeting with one of our managers, they refuse. As workers that make Amazon what it is, we deserve to be addressed with respect, and for management to engage in good faith discussion with our group. Please sign this petition to demand that Daniel Reyes meet with DCH1 Amazonians United, and support our fight to get equal PTO for all Amazon warehouse workers!
    26 of 100 Signatures
    Created by DCH1 Amazonians United
  • Sprouts Farmers Market is Good for Customers Terrible for Workers
    Sprouts Farmers Market is unusual that it offers healthy food for relatively low cost, setting itself a part from the larger organic grocery outlets like Trader Joes and Whole Foods. What Sprouts fails at is loyalty to their lowest paid hourly staff. With the larger grocers, employees are protected by unions and practices that ensure a better working atmosphere and better hours. Sprouts Farmers Market is focused on growth. While there are opportunities for employees to take advantage of health insurance as part-time workers, very few are given the hours to pay for health benefits, much less pay their bills. There are employees that have worked for Sprouts Farmers Market for two years or more that are scheduled 8 hours a week. There is next to no assurance of hours on a weekly basis. Hourly employees are subject to hap-hazard schedules. In California cost of living is sky high. As an hourly worker at Sprouts Farmers Market it's a joke to believe that you can get enough hours to live on or pay your bills because of hours are unpredictable week to week. Sprouts Farmers Market experiences very high turnover. Employees quit their jobs because they do not feel valued. This feeling of being undervalued stretches across pay scales and allocated hours. Sprouts Farmers Market is one of the very best of the best for its customers, and one of the very worst work environments, with morale that's consistently low. This must change. Sprouts Farmers Market averages a 2.9 rating out of 5 via Glassdoor. Most of the company reviews center around communication of executive staff, scattered scheduling and poor wages.
    4,169 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Jaime Prater Picture
  • It’s Time to Recognize the Kickstarter Union
    As Game Workers Unite co-founder and tech industry labor organizer Emma Kinema said in her recent XOXO speech, Kickstarter's mission to democratize the way in which people create art, music, games, tech, and writing is a noble and important pursuit, and it is only natural that it is at Kickstarter where we are seeing one of the first tangible signs of democratizing a tech industry workplace through unionization. Workers throughout tech, games, and many traditionally unorganized industries are watching, cheering on, and standing with the workers of Kickstarter in solidarity. Kickstarter United has sparked all of our imaginations and have our fullest support. Stand with them today!
    3,237 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Game Workers Picture
  • Starbucks Food Waste
    Making these changes would help cut down on food waste costs and labor costs across the company. And would ensure each store had a consistent and inviting pastry case display.
    18 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Alisa Shields
  • Allow Beards for Super 1 Employees!!!
    As long as the beard looks neat, clean and professional-looking, has defined chin and neck lines, doesn't exceed 2 inches in length, and people working in food preparation areas wear beard guards, there really is no reason why employees at Super 1 shouldn’t be able to have beards.
    3 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Isaac Gondo
  • Stop Starbucks UK from Wasting Food
    In my store we throw out about 30 items of food at the end of the day but UK staff are not allowed to take some home without buying it and we are banned from giving it away to homeless shelters etc. In the US, Starbucks has implemented a 'Food Share' program that distributes leftover meals to food banks but what about the hundreds of Starbucks stores in the UK?
    3,600 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Anon Ymous
  • Estes Express Lines: Pay Dock Workers Overtime After 40hrs
    Estes Express Lines is one of the largest freight trucking companies in the U.S. They currently have about 16,000 employees, more than 6,700 tractors and 30,000 trailers, and a network of 200+ terminals. They continue to grow bigger and bigger which is a good thing but a lot of us feel like the dock workers should be getting compensated for any overtime that is needed of us. We've been taking on so much freight this year that we have been put on mandatory 6th days. The fact we are having to work extra days that should be spent with our families, and we don't get paid overtime after 40 hours is a real kick in the gut. Not getting paid overtime after 40 hours makes us feel like we're getting taken advantage of. Every other position besides the dock worker gets some kind of compensation for working either over 40hrs a week or having to work a mandatory 6th day. Jockeys get overtime after 40hrs, office staff get overtime after 40hrs, management get compensation days. Why are the dock workers left out? We, the undersigned, respectfully call upon CEO Rob Estes to put into effect that all dock workers from Estes Express Lines get paid overtime after 40 hours in a work week. Surely the time has now come to see that this issue needs to be changed because the dock workers are not being treated equally. We submit this plea for the following reasons: 1. Everyone eles is paid overtime or gets a compensation day for a mandatory work day. 2. It's not treating us as equals as everyone else. 3. It would make having to work extra time or mandatory days not as bad. 4. It would boost the morale of the shifts. 5. It would cause better shifts to get created, so that all shifts are working more closely to the same amount of hours.
    4,331 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Alan Watts Picture
  • Severance for laid-off Tazza D'Oro staff
    My name is Adelaide Smith and I am a former barista and coffee equipment technician at Enrico’s Tazza D’Oro. I started working as a barista at the Highland Park location in April 2017 and have been with the company as it expanded from two cafes, to four cafes and a training lab. When I first started, it was clear that the management structure was somewhat disorganized and not totally functional, but as the new cafes opened, the situation became much worse. Stores have gone months at a time with no manager, so managing responsibilities were piled onto assistant manager and barista workloads. This resulted in day to day operations becoming increasingly stressful for baristas. When that trickled into bad experiences for customers, upper management would show up to hassle the staff about their performance and general attitude, leaving no opportunities for productive discourse. In the context of this managerial chaos, myself and other women consistently received lower scores on job evaluations compared to our few male coworkers, despite working for a company owned by a progressive woman. As a direct result of this disparity, men became eligible for higher raises then women at the barista level. This is a great example of how a well-intentioned feminist can perpetuate gender-based wage disparities in the workplace by failing to implement systems and structures that insure just and equitable working conditions. I don’t believe the owner wants gender-based discrimination to be happening anywhere, but the current structure of her own business makes the issue difficult to address. The owner, Amy Enrico, has a history of retaliating against workers who speak out. In one such instance, where two baristas were fired after bringing up concerns at a staff meeting, the National Labor Relations Board was prepared to back the workers in a federal suit, though Tazza and the employees settled out of court. Throughout the various locations staff have been intimidated and harassed by management in retaliation to collective concerns and issues that baristas had no power over. As the equipment tech and part of the coffee quality control team, I would look into any situations where coffee quality was below our standards. On three specific occasions at the Millvale cafe, management came down on the entire barista staff accusing them of making bad coffee, when the problem was out of their control. I pinpointed the equipment issues that compromised our standards and made the issues known to management, but management continued to hassle the baristas until I was able to fix the issues and show that with properly functioning machinery, the coffee was not just adequate, but better than the other locations. Workers at the Millvale location have been targeted and blamed for the poor performance of the store despite their earnest attempts to make that cafe thrive. When management got onto them about evening shifts taking too long, staff worked off the clock to make sure the cafe was stocked and clean for the morning shift. In April of this year, the Millvale staff was told their jobs had been eliminated and the store was closed with only a day’s notice. Later that day on their social media accounts, Tazza D’Oro claimed they would just be closing the Millvale cafe for only a week and reopening the following Tuesday. After the fired workers organized a picket, the plans to reopen the store were postponed. One of the workers was able to pick up part-time work at another location, while the other four are trying to make it by on unemployment. I know these kinds of issues are commonplace in the restaurant industry, but they don’t have to be! We’re calling on Tazza D’Oro to do the right thing and sit down with us, develop a plan to restructure the company, and pay severance to the laid-off Millvale workers.
    3,374 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Adelaide Smith
  • Plastic Bag Ban
    Because plastic bags and plastic, in general, are having a severely detrimental effect on the earth's ecosystems. We can all do our part of course in refusing plastic but our actions only go so far. We must demand businesses and corporations in leading the way to more clean energy and eco-friendly alternatives.
    33 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Stefan Trimm
  • We Support a Just & Healthy Workplace at WE ACT for Environmental Justice
    Next to members and residents, staff are the organization's most important asset and the key way the organization fulfills its mission. Like non-profit workers everywhere, we are committed to serving this mission, whether on the streets of Harlem or the halls of government, with great pride. But our current working environment is needlessly unsustainable. It is leading to high turnover and poor staff health, and impacting our programs and partnerships. As a staff made up of predominantly women, people of color, low-income, and residents of Northern Manhattan, we draw inspiration from our co-founders bold action on the West Side Highway in 1988. Their courageous example demonstrates that taking a stand for justice can sometimes be uncomfortable, but it is always the right thing to do. Through a union, we are reaffirming our commitment to WE ACT's mission. Together with management, we will find solutions to common challenges and reinvest in the organization's long-term success. More and more non-profit organizations are recognizing the value that a unionized workforce offers -- and we are confident that WE ACT will join this growing list soon. After all, New York City is a "Union Town." In view of our present climate crisis and the continued exclusion of low-income people of color from important political and environmental decisions, our members, supporters, and communities everywhere deserve only the best and strongest WE ACT we can build. WE are WE ACT and THIS is environmental justice!
    3,147 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by WE ACT Staff Union Picture