• Say the words! Solidarity means saying "Black Lives Matter"
    Recently Whole Foods workers have been sent home for wearing Black Lives Matter paraphernalia at work, on the grounds that they are somehow controversial. Respectfully, we beg to differ. As an Amazon employee, and a Black American descendant of enslaved peoples in this country, I must say, that anyone who believes that the words Black Lives Matter, are controversial suffers from an unfortunate delusional state induced by years of conditioning in white supremacist ideology. Workers should not be forced to choose between earning a living, and asserting that the lives of other human beings have value. Whole Foods is wholly wrong to have ever enforced this policy. Nothing short of a full throated apology and a sincere commitment to sit down, shut up, and LISTEN to us, will do at this point. This is not a request. It is a demand. Words have meaning, and you can't claim to be in solidarity with the Black community, and then show the reckless indifference to Black and Latinx lives that Amazon is demonstrating currently. While you're here sign our petition to shut down DSF4 for deep cleaning. We've had 3 confirmed cases of COVID 19 reported in the last month and management is lax about enforcing social distancing unless it's to get rid of an organizers like Hibaq Mohamed or myself. Workers should not be retaliated against for speaking up for the safety of themselves and their colleagues. Standing in solidarity in the fight against systemic racism and injustice means being willing to say that Black Lives Matter AND act on that truth by treating Black employees with the dignity and respect that we deserve.
    505 of 600 Signatures
    Created by John Hopkins
  • Justice 4 Edwin Medina
    We are outraged over LA’s BEST’s decision to embolden bigotry and terminate Edwin Medina’s employment after 16 years of dedicated service. LA’s BEST fired an exceptional leader because he dressed in drag to our end-of-year Zoom costume meeting on June 12. Edwin’s termination completely contradicts OUR organizations’ values of “sparking curiosity, expanding horizons, and strengthening relationships”. This is especially unacceptable and inexcusable given the context: It is Pride month, and we are in the middle of a new wave of the Civil Rights movement. We have suffered loss, financial stress, and social isolation due to COVID19. LA’s BEST is in the middle of a budget crisis and making cuts where you can to the detriment of our organization’s values and mission. Pride, Drag, & Bad Bunny It was a “meaningful choice” for Edwin to show his PRIDE, especially when LA’s BEST has been startingly quiet on the social issues of the moment. Edwin dressed up in drag as Bad Bunny in “Yo Perreo Sola”. This music video was released March 27, and featured Bad Bunny in drag. Billboard describes the music video, and Bad Bunny’s drag, as “visually eye-opening (and) conscientious, talking about respect for women and highlighting the LGBTQ+ community, a departure for Latin urban music”. By removing one word from LA’s BEST’s BLM statement, the hypocrisy becomes clear: “Through our afterschool enrichment program, we strive to combat the disparities created by oppressive and systemic … inequities and work to prepare our students and staff to become changemakers in our communities. We are all deeply connected to each other, and we remain committed to strengthening those connections through compassionate, positive youth development.” That starts with how you treat your employees. “Drag” is borderline synonymous with “queer”, and we regret that our unnamed colleague and LA’s BEST decided to punish Edwin’s personal expression with termination. During this historical moment, the Supreme Court has ruled that an employer cannot fire someone for being homosexual or transgender. Gender identity and expression should now be protected in the workplace. Edwin Medina should not have been terminated. Leadership Edwin was a stellar leader at LA’s BEST. He did much of the “dirty work” during the COVID19 crisis, discussing budget cuts with us, giving reassurance, and helping us navigate the shift to distance learning. Moreover, relationships were Edwin’s specialty - with his staff and with our kids. He offered us guidance, and as his staff, we always knew we could go to Edwin. He supported us through short staffed days, taking on groups of his own. He advocated for our professional and personal development. Edwin Medina was one of the BEST advocates and leaders among us. Edwin was comfortable being himself, and he empowered us - adults and youth - “to explore and discover the opportunities in (our) lives”. He “inspired and prepared (us) to create lives full of choices”, and you fired him for his choice to wear drag to a costume party. Unfortunately, many of us do not feel safe at LA’s BEST anymore. We believe the actions of our unnamed colleague and of LA’s BEST are rooted in ignorance and bigotry. We do not feel comfortable working in an organization that emboldens ignorance. We especially share concern for the youth we work with, many of whom are or will be members of the LGBTQ+ community. Hate and discrimination do not belong in this organization.
    247 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Jennifer McKenney
  • Respect Concerted Activity: I'm Essential Masks
    On or around Friday, June 19th, 2020, postings went up at Metro stating that masks with the words “I AM ESSENTIAL, NOT SACRIFICIAL” were political statements and not allowed to be worn while an employee was on paid time. Metro Management initially restricted drivers from wearing any masks at the start of the COVID-19 outbreak in March; Deputy Manager Crystal Martin suggested that masks were ineffective and did not need to be worn at a meeting with employees. City services were shut down or went remote, but Transit Operators were required to continue working with the public without sufficient protections or hazard pay. When masks were finally allowed, Metro workers began circulating these masks with our Teamster union emblem and the phrase “I AM ESSENTIAL, NOT SACRIFICIAL” along with Teamsters at numerous other employers across the country, public and private. This is protected concerted activity under Wisconsin 111.70(2) RIGHTS OF MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES, “Municipal employees have the right of self-organization, and the right to form, join, or assist labor organizations, to bargain collectively through representatives of their own choosing, and to engage in lawful, concerted activities for the purpose of collective bargaining or other mutual aid or protection.” Teachers and other public servants have acted collectively, wearing buttons and other literature for their mutual aid and protection, upheld consistently by the Wisconsin Employment Relations Commission and the courts. Metro workers have had to push consistently for safe working conditions and respect, through lock down and now as the City reopens - WE ARE ESSENTIAL, NOT SACRIFICIAL.
    381 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Madison City Worker
  • The Sherwin-Williams Company, please let us wear shorts.
    This is important to us because if we were allowed to wear shorts while working in higher temperatures, we would be less likely to overheat, which would, therefore, allow us to become more productive. Most of the employees work in warehouses that do not have A/C or are delivery drivers who are in the heat all day. It is important for us to stay cool and presentable while we work so that we can promote a healthy company image, one that Sherwin-Williams can continue to be proud of. We are required to look professional to uphold this image, and we think that khaki shorts would suffice, still meeting the professional attire requirements.
    3 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Jared Johnson
  • No Mask, No Service
    It is to protect both the employees and the customers from potentially catching anything and it keeps everyone safe. The workers should not have to be put at more risk just because a customer does not want to wear a mask.
    477 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Tryn Hinkle
  • Women AND men can have ear piercings
    I don't see why women can have gauges or ear piercings and why if you have them before being hired you can still have them at certain locations. Why can't we all have the same options?
    3 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Noah D'Zurilla Picture
  • Allow Colorful Hair and Tattoos at Cinemark
    Most of the employees at Cinemark are young; either in high school or college. This is a critical point in life to experiment with your appearance, but Cinemark is very conservative and allows no such thing. Many have meaningful tattoos and have to cover them up with a long sleeve shirts under their work shirt. In many cases, this makes them sweaty and tired from the extra heat, and oil and drinks splash onto the sleeves, leaving them wet. As for creative hair, more and more employers are realizing you can be professional with green or pink hair. The attitude matters, not the hair. Dress code itself is also limiting, only allowing an entirely black wardrobe down to the socks, often requiring employees to spend a decent amount of money on clothing they will only wear at work, including shoes. Freedom of expression will make employees happier and more productive at work, resulting in everyone being more satisfied all around.
    2,757 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Emilia Toczylowska
  • Dress code does not define work ethic
    The dress code policy at Loves Travel Stop is outdated. They need to change their policies about hair coloration. I’ve had several employees harassed and severely upset with the corporation due to these policies. Hard workers shouldn’t lose their jobs over the color of their hair.
    8 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Maddy Noe
  • Allow Beards for Super 1 Employees!!!
    As long as the beard looks neat, clean and professional-looking, has defined chin and neck lines, doesn't exceed 2 inches in length, and people working in food preparation areas wear beard guards, there really is no reason why employees at Super 1 shouldn’t be able to have beards.
    3 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Isaac Gondo
  • Ventilated Hoods For EVERYONE
    Many of our coworkers are becoming ill, overheating, and spending their time off with headaches due to the non-ventilated hoods. I have seen my co-workers continuously feeling faint/dizzy, having panic attacks, sweating profusely, and even vomiting. I’ve seen people have to leave the clean room for air because the unvented hoods are completely unbearable for the overwhelming majority of us. People are quitting their jobs over this. Those of us that are pregnant, susceptible to migraines, susceptible to vertigo, currently battling illness, etc. are at even more risk due to the implementation of non-ventilated hoods. Those of us who have no pre-existing conditions are experiencing symptoms of heat exhaustion as well. This is only day 3! What are the long term effects of working like this? What research has been done on the safety of working in these types of hoods? No one in our leadership has been able to answer these questions. It is up to us to tell them what is safe and healthy for us! We need ventilated hoods for ALL clean-room workers, starting right now! This issue is not just a matter of us being inconvenienced or slightly uncomfortable, we believe this is a human rights violation and a violation of our OSHA rights. Help me let our policy-writers know that we are NOT okay with this!
    157 of 200 Signatures
  • Allow Baristas To Wear Purple And Green
    To Allow More Freedom Of Dresscode Choice. Also, To Allow Us To Express Ourselves With A Little More Color At Work.
    3 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Krista Rogers Picture
  • Gender Neutral Dress Code
    1. ensures that there’s fair and equal dress code expectations between men and women. 2. prevents unfair discrimination of LGBTQIA employees, especially those whose sex or gender does not fall on the male/ female binary. (Ie: trans, non-binary, and intersex individuals). 3. promotes equal workplace expression for all
    44 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Max Adler Picture