• It’s Time to Recognize the Kickstarter Union
    As Game Workers Unite co-founder and tech industry labor organizer Emma Kinema said in her recent XOXO speech, Kickstarter's mission to democratize the way in which people create art, music, games, tech, and writing is a noble and important pursuit, and it is only natural that it is at Kickstarter where we are seeing one of the first tangible signs of democratizing a tech industry workplace through unionization. Workers throughout tech, games, and many traditionally unorganized industries are watching, cheering on, and standing with the workers of Kickstarter in solidarity. Kickstarter United has sparked all of our imaginations and have our fullest support. Stand with them today!
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    Created by Game Workers Picture
  • iHeartMedia: Offer paid family leave to ALL your employees
    I’m a dad, and I’ve got another baby on the way (due in two months!) and while I’ve worked for iHeartMedia for eight months, I will not have access to a single day of paid parental leave when our newborn arrives. iHeartMedia, formerly Clear Channel, is the largest owner of radio stations in the country - reaching millions of listeners across the United States every day. But for a company that touches so many families and households, they are surprisingly behind the times when it comes to its paid leave for its employees. iHeartmedia only provides time for childbirth recovery, no time for dads like me to bond with a new baby or support a partner recovering from childbirth, no time to care for a seriously ill family member, and new mothers are forced to have to sign up for Short-Term Disability in order to reap the benefits of any type of leave towards childbirth. I love working for iHeartmedia. I’m both a Software Engineer and a DJ, so my work touches on both of my passions, technology and music. I am lucky enough to work on an AMAZING project where, for the most part, my team is very flexible when it comes to our work schedule, which is why I feel and believe that iHeartMedia can do MUCH better when it comes to paid family leave. I’m surprised that we are falling behind so many of our competitors when it comes to this benefit. I know that iHeartMedia is an awesome company, and I know they can do better for dads like me, and all new parents. That’s why I’m asking that the company show bold leadership in the industry and expand the paid family leave policy to include ALL parents.
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    Created by Kevin and PL+US
  • Zoom Denver - We Need Bicycle Accommodations!
    If you're like me, you are immensely proud of Zoom's mission to not only lead the charge on workplace happiness, but also to set a new standard for the impact we have on the community around us. This is evident in programs like our maternity/paternity benefits, in our grassroots nonprofit projects like Erin Kehoe's PB&J sandwich drive, and in our partnership with the Ronald McDonald House. Not to mention the incredible crew that makes it all happen (Thank you Emily Crane and Melissa Dorsch!). I am also just as proud of Denver's heart for being leaders in similar initiatives, like Denver's Housing First Program which has received $11 million from the city in the last 2 years and has an 89% retention rate among homeless recipients, to $447 million for 35 school construction projects across Colorado for 2018-2019. Zooms culture in Denver is the perfect storm, and we are constantly working towards setting new standards in responsible and forward-thinking community impact. One of the initiatives which Zoom has leaned into more recently is one around emissions/waste/environmental. From metal straws, to recycled plates and utensils, to public transportation benefits, Zoom has made a point of encouraging employees to reduce their environmental impact. Even our platform has massive benefit for customers via reduction in travel, which translates into unbelievable emissions savings (1 roundtrip flight from SF to London = 1 Ton of CO2). Where we currently lag far behind, especially in the Denver office of all places, is Bicycle accommodations. Bicycles are considered the most efficient form of transportation, and are widely accepted and accommodated for in the Tech industry, especially in Colorado. We know it may be an uphill battle with our building, but it is truly a small ask considering its impact, especially in the city where this is the standard.
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    Created by Jay De Beer
  • Demand the FMCSA take immediate action on Sexual Misconduct in Truck Driver Training Fleets
    On July 23, 2019 the FMCSA posted a request for comments to study what they called a “serious pattern of harassment and assault related crimes against female and minority male truckers.”. For over a decade, harassment and sexual assault in entry-level driver training programs has been well-documented and grossly overlooked by the trucking industry and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), the regulatory agency that is tasked with overseeing safety in the trucking industry. We need a plan of action to address this pattern of abuse and bring about meaningful change NOW! The FMCSA has ignored widely available public information and extensive reporting on rampant sexual assault and rape long-endemic to the trucking industry. The FMCSA should immediately place carriers where sexual assault and rape continue to occur on probation—and disallow repeat offenders from recruitment to their driver training programs until they clean up their act. Without a meaningful and urgent implementation plan, the FMCSA’s request for comments is without teeth—a simple stalling technique and a free pass for the trucking industry. My name is Desiree Wood and I am the President and Founder of REAL Women in Trucking, Inc. (RWIT), a 501 (c) (6) organization. I am also a truck driver myself that experienced sexual misconduct and several potentially violent situations during my truck driver training from 2007-2008 at Covenant Transport, based in Chattanooga, Tennessee. As a student truck driver, I was badgered to discuss sex with a co-driver and I also experienced intimidation, culminating in a violent altercation in which bleach was sprayed at my face. During this altercation, my wrist was badly injured while I tried to send an SOS message to the company over the Qualcomm, the only communication device available to me to seek assistance from my company. My co-driver forcefully yanked from my arms to prevent me from calling for help. I was left behind in New Mexico for several days, a place where I knew no one, while my violent co-driver that had sprayed me with bleach was permitted to continue driving the tractor-trailer. He was highly intoxicated after consuming five Long Island Ice teas and was permitted to operate the commercial motor vehicle on Interstate 40 while I was left behind. When I reported the incident to the Human Resources department at Covenant Transport, they told me they would investigate—but they never did. Even though the incident was likely captured by security cameras and I had filed a police report—the company instead turned their attention to me as a troublemaker. I formed REAL Women in Trucking, Inc. (RWIT) with other lady truck drivers as a protest movement and in a response to the ENABLERS IN THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY AND THE ABSENCE OF AUTHENTIC REPRESENTATION FOR WOMEN WHO WORK AS TRUCK DRIVERS. Our mission is to deliver highway safety through leadership, mentorship, education and advocacy. RWIT has formed into a growing community of women truck drivers that offers support to new truck drivers and we demand change in the trucking industry. RWIT is known as the “go to” organization when it comes to sexual assault and harassment in truck driver training; we offer support and resources to women entering the industry when they otherwise would have nowhere to turn, but it’s not enough. Over the past decade, I’ve personally received weekly distress calls and email from hundreds of women across the country who have had similar or worse experiences during their driver training. In just the past two years, distress calls to our organization have INCREASED at an alarming rate. SEPERATING GENDERS IS NOT THE ANSWER TO THIS PROBLEM SINCE WOMEN HAVE REPORTED BEING ASSAULTED BY WOMEN BOTH PHYSICALLY AND SEXUALLY! The solution to this issue begins with removing rapists and harassers from truck driver training fleets along with the enablers that allow them to thrive. The FMCSA is directly responsible for overseeing entry-level truck driver training programs and they have blatantly ignored this issue long enough. No more paper tiger advisory committees and comment collections that deliver nothing and end up appointing known industry enablers to oversee the issues in these training fleets. Please sign this petition from the REAL Women in Trucking to call on the FMCSA to take immediate action.
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    Created by Desiree Wood Picture
  • Amazon Management: Meet with DCH1 Amazonians United now!
    We work hard every night and day to make sure Amazon packages get delivered, but our working-conditions issues are never resolved. The issues speak for themselves. Our pay is inadequate. We need access to healthcare. And an "Excessive Heat Watch" is in effect this week, and the only step Amazon management has taken to combat heat exhaustion is to give us popsicles. We need real solutions. We need Dominic to meet with us now.
    5,098 of 6,000 Signatures
    Created by DCH1 Amazonians United
  • Equal Pay for USWNT
    As a long time fan and supporter of the USWNT, this cause is very near and dear to me. Watching the USWNT is an immense source of joy for me, as well as for my family. My mom and I have bonded over watching the USWNT and we know there are many others who share the same story and want to see these women be paid what they deserve. The USWNT has won 4 World Cup titles, and placed in either 2nd or 3rd in the rest (out of the 8 women’s World Cup tournaments.) Additionally, they have 4 Olympic Gold medals, while the men have won ZERO world cups despite the men’s World Cup being around since 1930 (about 60 years longer than the women’s) and ZERO Olympic gold medals. Additionally, the women’s game generates as much as and even more revenue and merchandise sales, from fiscal 2016 to 2018, the women’s games generated about $900,000 more revenue than the men’s games. In the year following the 2015 World Cup win, women’s games generated $1.9 million more than the men’s games, AND the USA women’s home jersey, in the midst of the 2019 world cup, had already become the #1 selling soccer jersey, for both men and women, ever sold on Nike’s website in one season, yet the women are being paid a mere fraction of the men’s team while the women continue to defy odds, face continuous criticism and sexism while still effortlessly winning world titles left and right. I'm hoping this petition continues to raise awareness about this issue, and not only show that the USWNT deserves equal pay for equal/superior play, but to show how the women's game in general needs more attention and funding to rise to the level of the men's game worldwide. The USWNT is a prime example of how women's sports can and will succeed and rise to the highest level of play, and it's up to us as fans to give our full support and make sure our voices are heard so all these phenomenal women athletes are given the opportunities and salaries they deserve.
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    Created by Niki Shadoan
  • Estes Express Lines: Pay Dock Workers Overtime After 40hrs
    Estes Express Lines is one of the largest freight trucking companies in the U.S. They currently have about 16,000 employees, more than 6,700 tractors and 30,000 trailers, and a network of 200+ terminals. They continue to grow bigger and bigger which is a good thing but a lot of us feel like the dock workers should be getting compensated for any overtime that is needed of us. We've been taking on so much freight this year that we have been put on mandatory 6th days. The fact we are having to work extra days that should be spent with our families, and we don't get paid overtime after 40 hours is a real kick in the gut. Not getting paid overtime after 40 hours makes us feel like we're getting taken advantage of. Every other position besides the dock worker gets some kind of compensation for working either over 40hrs a week or having to work a mandatory 6th day. Jockeys get overtime after 40hrs, office staff get overtime after 40hrs, management get compensation days. Why are the dock workers left out? We, the undersigned, respectfully call upon CEO Rob Estes to put into effect that all dock workers from Estes Express Lines get paid overtime after 40 hours in a work week. Surely the time has now come to see that this issue needs to be changed because the dock workers are not being treated equally. We submit this plea for the following reasons: 1. Everyone eles is paid overtime or gets a compensation day for a mandatory work day. 2. It's not treating us as equals as everyone else. 3. It would make having to work extra time or mandatory days not as bad. 4. It would boost the morale of the shifts. 5. It would cause better shifts to get created, so that all shifts are working more closely to the same amount of hours.
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    Created by Alan Watts Picture
  • Werk is Work! SF Bay Drag Employers: Pay a Minimum Booking Fee
    Drag performers attract paying customers, and keep the San Francisco Bay Area weird and amazing. Often our community incurs high costs with little return for our labor. We’re amazing people to work with and we support a slew of other paid roles in our event production. If this isn’t enough to convince you, keep reading. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ We want that San Francisco Bay Area bars, clubs, and other employers of drag entertainment ensure that each drag performer and staff receive AT LEAST $40 per show: $40 = 2 numbers max, no more than 2 hours at the venue. *Tips only agreements: the employer must close the gap if $40 minimum is not made in tips. **Open spots (i.e. Club Poppers): technically, no one is “booked.” Participation is at the promoters’ and performers’ discretion. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- My name is Alexis Atauri and I am a drag queen in San Francisco. For the past 3 years, I have cried, laughed, lived, and loved with a community of performers, DJ’s, lighting designers, wig makers, and other talented artists in the Bay Area. A true labor of love, I’ve seen my community sacrifice so much to continue to push the boundaries of gender expression, art, and weirdness while still advocating and creating space for everyone. It’s never going to be easy, and we wouldn’t want it to be. However, despite the ongoing conversation about dignified pay in our community, we are not organizing action around this conversation. Some venues pay well; some don’t. Regardless of our skill and experience, don’t we all deserve to expect a minimum booking fee if we are asked to share our drag? I believe we do and I want to fight for better pay for us all. We want a fair return on our Labor. This is no different from dancers, makeup artists, hair stylists, and other artists. We want employers to take us just as seriously when requesting our services so that we can establish and sustain good working relationships, and quality performances for customers to keep coming back. Knowing that the venues where we work support fair treatment and dignified paid for all workers, including us, can only improve our art. It can’t hurt. A minimum of $40/performer is more than a reasonable cost for anyone booking drag in the Bay Area. It doesn’t make performers who get paid more suddenly receive less compensation. It doesn’t force newer queens to hustle or have a traumatic experience starting out in drag. It will discourage performers from price gouging each other. Ultimately, it will allow our community to continue to exist and thrive in a financially tumultuous city. Awareness is an important part of this conversation. Audience members, employers, and corporations (i.e. people who don’t do drag) don’t know firsthand what it takes to produce a look, a performance, or even just a face. Encouraging transparency about the cost and compensation of drag may encourage audience members and employers to better value our productions with tips, increased budgets, or even perks like free drinks, VIP access, or free guest entry. Bay Area drag is diverse, so I expect the opinions surrounding this conversation to also be dissonant, but constructive. The important part - or “Why?” - is that we have this conversation and take action. The cost of sustaining drag is no joke. Most of the time a night’s pay (including tips) doesn’t cover the cost of the makeup, costume, and transportation to support the event. I admire Bay Area Drag performers’ ability to be creative about reusing content, sourcing cheap materials, and working side gigs while still delivering top-notch performances. A minimum booking fee will only help us continue to thrive in performances and other hustles. The more money invested into us, the more fabulosity we can put out, and the more customers we can attract for bars/clubs. Making sure this conversation is inclusive of other roles and performers in our drag scene is important, too. We wouldn’t shine as bright without our DJ’s, handlers, door staff, and stage managers, for example. Fighting for pay for all can only increase the quality of the entertainment we produce, increasing the patronage to the bar/club as well. It also stands to mention I feel that pole dancers, voguers, burlesque, puppet masters, and anyone who is on stage with us deserve fair compensation and the audience’s attention; they are included in this conversation about drag compensation. I believe anyone who is asked to spend their time and talent to be a part of a drag production should be included in the budget, and employers should also value them alongside drag performers. Everyone’s work deserves to be dignified and should be compensated fairly. What is the importance of drag in the community, anyway? Hopefully, you scoffed at this rhetorical question. The first largely recognized social rights movement for LGBTQIA was started by a black, transgender drag queen in New York City. We provide spaces for those in the community that are often cast aside, celebrating their queerness and providing the means for them to thrive in the bay. Look no further than the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence to see that donning a look and exaggerating your personality is an effective way to serve our community where they are most in need. We keep San Francisco Bay Area weird. We support other artists. We give you something sparkly to look at when you’re out. We sustain safe spaces. Drag has always been there for our community, and we are the best version of ourselves when the community is there for us, too. I hope you can stand beside us and support our efforts! XOXO Alexis Atauri
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    Created by Alexis Atauri Picture
  • Pay all Uber drivers $15hr
    This company has billions of dollars and spending on other technology. They can pay us the minimum of $15hr with no problem! There customer service department is not the great! There advertising is false and I think they should be held accountable! People deserve paid decent paying wage. As a past driver it's alot dealing with people, traffic and tending to your car, car insurance payments and dealing with disputes. Pay drivers hourly and they need benefits alot drive for 8 hours a day or more!
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    Created by Slava Digriz Picture
  • Uber: Give Drivers Their Fair Share
    My name is Mostafa Maklad and I have been an Uber driver since 2014. I’ve given 8,000 rides, usually driving between 50-60 hours a week — though sometimes it’s 80. The living hourly wage — the amount of money one needs to earn to afford housing, food, medical care and transportation — is about $20 for a single adult in San Francisco; I routinely make half that. Because of this, I joined the international Uber Shut Down on May 8th. Together, drivers made history. Rideshare drivers in six countries across the world organized a global day of action protesting Uber's IPO. In the U.S., over 10 cities joined in including Philadelphia, Boston, Atlanta, Chicago, New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. Drivers in every city stood together to call on Uber to pay us a living wage and treat us with dignity and respect. Uber drivers provide services that so many rely on every day to move through their lives — rides to school, work, medical appointments, social events and safe passage back home. As drivers, we pour ourselves into our work, doing one of the most dangerous jobs in our society to ensure that every passenger arrives safely at their destination. But Uber excludes us from basic worker protections. Without these protections, we face low wages and labor abuses. We have no way to organize and Uber denies us crucial benefits like health insurance, disability, overtime or workers comp. We face unsafe working conditions and have no recourse when we're deactivated. Drivers take all the risk, executives get all the reward. But now, we are calling on Uber to give us our fair share: - Living wage: Uber must pay drivers a livable hourly rate (after expenses). - Transparency: Clear policies on wages, tips, fare breakdowns and deactivations. - Benefits: Such as disability, workers comp, retirement, health care, death benefits, and paid time off. - Voice at work: A recognized independent worker organization, the freedom to stand together without fear of retaliation and a fair and transparent process for deactivations. Sign on now to stand with drivers!
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    Created by Gig Workers Rising
  • Drivers Need a Living Wage
    My name is Mostafa Maklad and I am an Uber driver in San Francisco. I've been a driver for 3 years and have given over 8000 rides on Uber. Uber is about to launch their IPO, which will put billions in the pockets of executives. But I can't help but wonder: what will drivers get? Uber and Lyft drivers provide services that so many people rely on every day to move through their lives — rides to school, work, medical appointments, social events and safe passage back home. As drivers, we pour ourselves into our work, doing one of the most dangerous jobs in our society to ensure that every passenger arrives safely at their destination. But Uber denies rideshare drivers like me a living wage by constantly slashing rates and pocketing the difference. Drivers should make a living wage. California has always been a leader in protecting workers and now it is time for California to take the lead again - drivers need a living wage.
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    Created by Gig Workers Rising
  • We Support a Just & Healthy Workplace at WE ACT for Environmental Justice
    Next to members and residents, staff are the organization's most important asset and the key way the organization fulfills its mission. Like non-profit workers everywhere, we are committed to serving this mission, whether on the streets of Harlem or the halls of government, with great pride. But our current working environment is needlessly unsustainable. It is leading to high turnover and poor staff health, and impacting our programs and partnerships. As a staff made up of predominantly women, people of color, low-income, and residents of Northern Manhattan, we draw inspiration from our co-founders bold action on the West Side Highway in 1988. Their courageous example demonstrates that taking a stand for justice can sometimes be uncomfortable, but it is always the right thing to do. Through a union, we are reaffirming our commitment to WE ACT's mission. Together with management, we will find solutions to common challenges and reinvest in the organization's long-term success. More and more non-profit organizations are recognizing the value that a unionized workforce offers -- and we are confident that WE ACT will join this growing list soon. After all, New York City is a "Union Town." In view of our present climate crisis and the continued exclusion of low-income people of color from important political and environmental decisions, our members, supporters, and communities everywhere deserve only the best and strongest WE ACT we can build. WE are WE ACT and THIS is environmental justice!
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    Created by WE ACT Staff Union Picture
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