• Uber: Give consumers the option of adding a tip to all Uber fares
    Uber initially marketed its transportation service as a seamless and cashless experience where the tip was included in the fare calculation. In fact, the fare calculation was, and is simply based upon time, distance, tolls, and surge charge. Notably absent is a gratuity. Eventually, Uber moved away from saying that the “tip is included in the fare” to a more ambiguous “there is no need to tip.” Based upon Uber’s global marketing, many Uber customers falsely believe that the Uber fare includes an automatic tip. While UberTaxi does include an automatic tip, the UberX, UberXL, UberPlus, UberBlack, and UberSUV platforms do NOT include any gratuity at all. Uber is fully aware of the confusion that exists in the marketplace regarding the tips. In fact, Uber’s present independent contractor agreement advises drivers that there is “no tipping.” But then, in the same sentence, advises drivers that Uber may, through advertising and marketing, communicate to customers that “tipping” is “’included in the Service Fee paid by the User.” In a recent commutation to an Uber customer, however, the Company clarified the tip issue by saying: “There’s no function that will allow riders to tip their drivers for vehicle options other than UberTaxi. That means for uberX, uberBlack, and the rest of the Uber services, you can’t leave a tip. And yes, the fare is simply a calculation of the base fare, time, distance, tolls, and surge rate.” Uber passengers deserve to know the truth and to have the option to tip within the app if they choose. In the past year, Uber has drastically reduced its fares, while at the same time increasing the commission it takes from each trip. For example, in December 2013, in Los Angeles, the uberX fare was $2.40 per mile, $0.60 per minute, with a base fare of $4.00. Of that fare, Uber would take a 5% commission. Today, an uberX driver will make $1.10 per mile, $0.21 per minute, with a base fare of $0.80. Of that reduced fare, Uber now takes a 25% commission. This means many of Uber drivers are taking home a lot less for our work than we used to, and we have to increase our hours behind the wheel by up to 50% in order to make up for the reduction in fares, and Uber's increased commission. Allowing a way for users to provide tips to drivers would make a huge difference to drivers and the families for which many of them are providing. It would also be a boost for driver morale and another incentive to great service. It shouldn’t be hard for Uber -- a tech company -- to create options within the app to allow customers to automatically tip their drivers. In fact, they are already doing it -- for uberTaxi, one of Uber’s services, users can request a ride from a regular cab through the app, and a default 20% tip is included in the fare (and app users can adjust that percentage online). If it can be done for uberTaxi, surely an innovative tech company like Uber could develop a solution for users to provide tips for drivers across all of its different services -- just like its competitor Lyft offers. Placing an automatic tip within the Uber app would be a win for both customers and drivers alike. Please join CADA in asking Uber to update its technology by adding a 20% default tip to ALL Uber fares. Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/people/afagen/
    3,377 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by J. DeWolf
  • Let us dye our hair
    As a young child I wanted to have pink hair and was never able to due to my parents disapproval of an unnatural hair color. Once I was on my own I thought I would finally be able to go through with it. I soon found out that finding a job in which I could actually have pink hair was almost impossible. I now have my pink hair and I love it. However I have to wear an itchy wig to cover it up. I love my job and I love my regulars. I come by on my days off and people always compliment my "cotton candy" hair; it's something that makes me who I am and think I should be allowed to be that person always.
    645 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Diana Gonzalez
  • Wells Fargo: Reduce income inequality by giving employees a wage increase
    With the increasing focus on income inequality in the United States, Wells Fargo has an opportunity to be at the forefront of helping to reduce this disparity by setting a higher bar. I believe Wells Fargo could demonstrate to other large corporations that it is very possible to maintain a profitable company that not only looks out for its consumers and shareholders, but its employees as well. This year, Wells Fargo in its second quarter alone had a net income of $5.7 billion, and total revenue of $21.1 billion. These are very impressive numbers and it’s obvious that Wells Fargo is one of the most profitable company in the nation right now. Last year, Wells Fargo’s CEO, John Stumpf, pulled in over $19 million, more than most of the employees will see in our lifetimes. Meanwhile, the vast majority of employees barely make enough to live comfortably on their own. So, why not take some of this and distribute it to the rest of the employees? Sure, the company provides (while not great), some pretty good benefits, as well as discretionary profit sharing for those who partake in our 401k program. While the benefits are nice, the profit sharing through the 401k only goes to make the company itself and its shareholders more profitable rather than boost the income of the thousands of us here every day making this company the prestigious powerhouse that it is. My estimate is that Wells Fargo has roughly around 300,000 employees. My proposal is take $3 billion dollars, just a small fraction of what Wells Fargo pulls in annually, and raise every employee’s annual salary by $10,000. This equates to an hourly raise of about $4.71 per hour. Think, as well, of the positive publicity in a time of extreme consumer skepticism towards banks. By doing this, Wells Fargo will not only help to make its people -- its family -- more happy, productive, and financially stable, it will also show the rest of the United States, if not the world that, that big corporations can have a heart other than philanthropic endeavors. Each and every one of us plays an integral part in the success of this company. It is time that we ask to be rightfully compensated for the hard work that we accomplish, and for the great part we all have played in the success of this company. There are many of us out there who come to work every day and give it our all, yet, we struggle to make ends meet while our peers in upper management and company executives reap the majority of the rewards. One of our lowest scored TMCS questions is that our opinions matter. Well they do! While the voice of one person in a world as large as ours may seem only like a whisper, the combined voices of each and all of us can move mountains! Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/people/andrewbain. The license to this image can be found here: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/
    4,620 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Tyrel Oates
  • Release Data on Gender Pay Ratios
    CEO Nadella wrote employees this week: "Without a doubt I wholeheartedly support programs at Microsoft and in the industry that bring more women into technology and close the pay gap. I believe men and women should get equal pay for equal work." As a woman working in the tech industry, equal pay for equal work is important to me too. But from my experience in San Francisco, in many cases in our industry -- as in others -- women are still paid less than our male colleagues. Microsoft's latest publicly available data on workforce diversity shows that men occupy 82.7% of all leadership positions inside the company. With such lopsided representation in leadership, one wonders how Microsoft holds up on pay equity. Do women at Microsoft earn the same as their male counterparts? Are employees actually earning equal pay for equal work? The Bureau of Labor Statistics data for 2013 shows that women in the tech industry still earn substantially less than their male counterparts. It's everyone's job to close the gender pay gap -- including Microsoft -- but we can't do it without the data. Microsoft is in a position to lead the industry on this issue. Releasing diversity numbers is not enough -- gender equity includes your paycheck. Employees, shareholders and the public have a right to know whether Microsoft pays women and men equal pay for equal work. Let's disclose the pay ratios across the company -- and if there is a pay discrepancy, let's get to work fixing it! Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/people/bagogames/ License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
    149 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Debra Cleaver
  • Fair treatment for workers at Metso
    With cost of living rising 3.3% in Western Australia last financial year, and Metso Minerals only offering a 2.8% wage increase - workers are going to struggle to make ends meet. They are just asking for a fair days pay, for a fair days work!
    35 of 100 Signatures
    Created by National Union of Workers Picture
  • We want dreads in Jimmy Johns
    The employees and customers want to see that Jimmy stands by his "Rockstars wanted!" statements. Rockstars stand out in a crowd and show enthusiasm constantly. Shouldn't unique hair, style or vibrant coloring, be a good thing for a business that wants to stand out and attract a variety of different customers? Letting employees at Jimmy johns express who they really are leads to better attitudes and enthusiasm for their jobs. Which leads to a contagious happiness for our customers. Therefore gaining yet another returning customer purely on satisfaction alone. With the speed and diversity among the staff we mark a strong memory in their minds that will create a frequent customer base.
    92 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Sheena Grantz
  • Groceries, Not Guns at Kroger
    Kroger spokesperson Keith Dailey has said that Kroger won’t prohibit open carry because: “[W]e don't want to put our associates in a position of having to confront a customer who is legally carrying a gun." But all too often, weak gun laws make it impossible to discern whether someone open carrying a gun in a grocery store is a responsible, law-abiding citizen or a person who poses a threat. Allowing open carry in stores is not in line with Kroger’s core values to provide a "safe and secure workplace and shopping environment." If our employer doesn’t want us in the position of having to confront customers openly carrying guns, they should enact a policy prohibiting such behavior. What’s more: Kroger doesn’t allow guns to be openly carried in its corporate headquarters in Cincinnati. Why do they allow it in other Kroger-owned workplaces? All Kroger employees—whether executives, managers, cashiers, or customer service representatives like me—deserve a safe workplace. Kroger should join the growing number of American businesses who have adopted policies to prevent open carry, including Starbucks, Target, Panera, Chipotle, Jack in the Box, Chilis, and Sonic. Please join me in asking Kroger to prohibit open carry of guns in its stores.
    53 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Mary Mueller
  • Jimmy John's: We want visible tattoos too
    Having to adhere to the dress code rules of not being able to show our ink is an outdated practice as Kristie Williams as proven with the mass amount of signatures on her campaign to get Starbucks to revise its dress code policies. Just as in the petition to Starbucks to change its dress code to allow visible tattoos, we should be able to show ours as well. We work hard for this company. We are supposed to make all sandwiches in under 30 seconds through anytime of the day, and keep a good attitude the whole time we do it. Letting us express our individuality isn't really much to ask for -- especially since we're supposed to be these "Rockstar" employees. When I first started working for Jimmy John's, you had to wear white socks that covered your ankle. This was in the dress code. I can't fathom why the color or length of my socks are detrimental to making sandwiches. It's the same with this outdated policy to keep tattoos covered up. Jimmy Johns eventually changed its policy on socks, and I really do believe that this company can be swayed to revise its policy on this issue as well. Just as the white socks really didn't matter, neither does having us keep our tattoos covered up. Jimmy Johns is really an impressive business model. Fresh veggies, freshly sliced meat, great bread baked all day, small delivery areas for faster deliveries, and first and foremost, FAST service. I think it's time to let employees unleash our inner "Rockstar" and let us not have to cover up our tattoos. It's 2014, no one really cares when they go into a quick service restaurant and the people working behind the counter have some ink -- plus it will make our work a lot more comfortable, efficient and pleasant. LET'S MOVE FORWARD TOGETHER AND REVISE THESE OUTDATED RULES! (BIG thanks to Kristie Williams for inspiring this!)
    8,937 of 9,000 Signatures
    Created by Frederick Gautier
  • Starbucks, Pay Your Partners A Living Wage
    This is important because it's fair. Starbucks is making record profits. Earnings reports has profits the highest they have ever been (http://www.forbes.com/sites/alexadavis/2014/07/24/starbucks-sizzling-profits-get-cool-reception/) In years past, employees would be granted a personal day every quarter as well as sick time being available. After the financial crisis, personal and sick days went away, never to return. If partners get sick, they have to use their precious vacation time to make up the difference. The speed at which employees accrue vacation time was also cut down, so it takes longer to make enough to cover one day. Starbucks should and can do better. Starbucks Baristas operate their stores. It's non management that is responsible for creating that coveted third place environment (the space between home and work) that's so essential and so important to our loyal and wonderful customers. The larger percentage of Starbucks employees struggle to live from week to week. As amazing as the entire benefits package is, free coffee doesn't pay the bills. Free stock won't put gas in our car. Free tuition doesn't ensure a quality of life where many of us scrape by from week to week, just to afford food and gas.
    2,090 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Jaime Prater Picture
  • nail polish / nails/piercings
    We shouldn't have to change who we are just for a job that we need to make ends meet. We are in a new generation now filled with many people freely expressing themselves in different ways and work places shouldn't have rules that wont allow us to freely express ourselves.
    283 of 300 Signatures
    Created by melissa martinez Picture
  • Nissan: Make Temps Direct Hires After 180 Days!
    Nissan is the most productive automaker in North America. However, that productivity comes at a price. Only a fraction of Nissan's employees are directly hired and few earn the top pay rate. Most work for agencies like Yates, Onin or Calsonic - have few paid days off, and must deal with ever increasing line speeds. Nissan workers want to be directly hired, earn the top pay rate after a reasonable amount of time, and work at reasonable line speeds.
    301 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Peter DeMay
  • T-Mobile, eliminate mandatory work on Christmas Day!
    I have been a T-Mobile employee for 5 years, worked in several different departments and have never been asked to work on major holidays such as Christmas. Recently, I was informed that T-Mobile is now ranked number 1 for the prestigious JD Power Awards. It seems to me that in order to keep this competitive position, T-Mobile has decided that employees like me will be forced to work major holidays, including Christmas Day. Christmas Day is a time to be spent with family and loved ones. Whether you work for T-Mobile, or you just own a cell phone and care about the morals of your cell phone provider, please sign and share this petition, to show T-Mobile's CEO John Legere that it is not acceptable to force it's employees to work on Christmas Day. With enough voices, we can make a change!
    1,793 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Rebecca Disbrow