• Wells Fargo: Reduce income inequality by giving employees a wage increase
    With the increasing focus on income inequality in the United States, Wells Fargo has an opportunity to be at the forefront of helping to reduce this disparity by setting a higher bar. I believe Wells Fargo could demonstrate to other large corporations that it is very possible to maintain a profitable company that not only looks out for its consumers and shareholders, but its employees as well. This year, Wells Fargo in its second quarter alone had a net income of $5.7 billion, and total revenue of $21.1 billion. These are very impressive numbers and it’s obvious that Wells Fargo is one of the most profitable company in the nation right now. Last year, Wells Fargo’s CEO, John Stumpf, pulled in over $19 million, more than most of the employees will see in our lifetimes. Meanwhile, the vast majority of employees barely make enough to live comfortably on their own. So, why not take some of this and distribute it to the rest of the employees? Sure, the company provides (while not great), some pretty good benefits, as well as discretionary profit sharing for those who partake in our 401k program. While the benefits are nice, the profit sharing through the 401k only goes to make the company itself and its shareholders more profitable rather than boost the income of the thousands of us here every day making this company the prestigious powerhouse that it is. My estimate is that Wells Fargo has roughly around 300,000 employees. My proposal is take $3 billion dollars, just a small fraction of what Wells Fargo pulls in annually, and raise every employee’s annual salary by $10,000. This equates to an hourly raise of about $4.71 per hour. Think, as well, of the positive publicity in a time of extreme consumer skepticism towards banks. By doing this, Wells Fargo will not only help to make its people -- its family -- more happy, productive, and financially stable, it will also show the rest of the United States, if not the world that, that big corporations can have a heart other than philanthropic endeavors. Each and every one of us plays an integral part in the success of this company. It is time that we ask to be rightfully compensated for the hard work that we accomplish, and for the great part we all have played in the success of this company. There are many of us out there who come to work every day and give it our all, yet, we struggle to make ends meet while our peers in upper management and company executives reap the majority of the rewards. One of our lowest scored TMCS questions is that our opinions matter. Well they do! While the voice of one person in a world as large as ours may seem only like a whisper, the combined voices of each and all of us can move mountains! Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/people/andrewbain. The license to this image can be found here: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/
    4,621 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Tyrel Oates
  • Release Data on Gender Pay Ratios
    CEO Nadella wrote employees this week: "Without a doubt I wholeheartedly support programs at Microsoft and in the industry that bring more women into technology and close the pay gap. I believe men and women should get equal pay for equal work." As a woman working in the tech industry, equal pay for equal work is important to me too. But from my experience in San Francisco, in many cases in our industry -- as in others -- women are still paid less than our male colleagues. Microsoft's latest publicly available data on workforce diversity shows that men occupy 82.7% of all leadership positions inside the company. With such lopsided representation in leadership, one wonders how Microsoft holds up on pay equity. Do women at Microsoft earn the same as their male counterparts? Are employees actually earning equal pay for equal work? The Bureau of Labor Statistics data for 2013 shows that women in the tech industry still earn substantially less than their male counterparts. It's everyone's job to close the gender pay gap -- including Microsoft -- but we can't do it without the data. Microsoft is in a position to lead the industry on this issue. Releasing diversity numbers is not enough -- gender equity includes your paycheck. Employees, shareholders and the public have a right to know whether Microsoft pays women and men equal pay for equal work. Let's disclose the pay ratios across the company -- and if there is a pay discrepancy, let's get to work fixing it! Photo credit: https://www.flickr.com/people/bagogames/ License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
    149 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Debra Cleaver
  • Starbucks, Pay Your Partners A Living Wage
    This is important because it's fair. Starbucks is making record profits. Earnings reports has profits the highest they have ever been (http://www.forbes.com/sites/alexadavis/2014/07/24/starbucks-sizzling-profits-get-cool-reception/) In years past, employees would be granted a personal day every quarter as well as sick time being available. After the financial crisis, personal and sick days went away, never to return. If partners get sick, they have to use their precious vacation time to make up the difference. The speed at which employees accrue vacation time was also cut down, so it takes longer to make enough to cover one day. Starbucks should and can do better. Starbucks Baristas operate their stores. It's non management that is responsible for creating that coveted third place environment (the space between home and work) that's so essential and so important to our loyal and wonderful customers. The larger percentage of Starbucks employees struggle to live from week to week. As amazing as the entire benefits package is, free coffee doesn't pay the bills. Free stock won't put gas in our car. Free tuition doesn't ensure a quality of life where many of us scrape by from week to week, just to afford food and gas.
    2,122 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Jaime Prater Picture
  • Nissan: Make Temps Direct Hires After 180 Days!
    Nissan is the most productive automaker in North America. However, that productivity comes at a price. Only a fraction of Nissan's employees are directly hired and few earn the top pay rate. Most work for agencies like Yates, Onin or Calsonic - have few paid days off, and must deal with ever increasing line speeds. Nissan workers want to be directly hired, earn the top pay rate after a reasonable amount of time, and work at reasonable line speeds.
    303 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Peter DeMay
  • T-Mobile, eliminate mandatory work on Christmas Day!
    I have been a T-Mobile employee for 5 years, worked in several different departments and have never been asked to work on major holidays such as Christmas. Recently, I was informed that T-Mobile is now ranked number 1 for the prestigious JD Power Awards. It seems to me that in order to keep this competitive position, T-Mobile has decided that employees like me will be forced to work major holidays, including Christmas Day. Christmas Day is a time to be spent with family and loved ones. Whether you work for T-Mobile, or you just own a cell phone and care about the morals of your cell phone provider, please sign and share this petition, to show T-Mobile's CEO John Legere that it is not acceptable to force it's employees to work on Christmas Day. With enough voices, we can make a change!
    1,793 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Rebecca Disbrow
  • Justice for former Bluestone workers
    In the words of a former Bluestone worker, "we live from pay to pay, we depend on our wages to be in our account so that we are able to pay our bills and rent". Bluestone's collapse has left some workers missing out on rent and mortgage payments leaving them feeling "sick" and "anxious". When you put in a day's work you should get a fair day's pay.
    183 of 200 Signatures
    Created by National Union of Workers Picture
  • Let's Build a Better Ikea Together!
    We work at the IKEA store in Seattle, Washington. Together we have close to 10 years of experience. We enjoy our jobs at IKEA, and take a lot of pride in delighting our customers. However, like many part-time workers in retail, we struggle to pay our bills. Sometimes we work almost full-time, but many times we have to make ends meet on less than 25 hours per week. After co-workers spoke out about the need for higher pay, IKEA responded by raising starting pay to match the living wage for our community. Beginning January 1, the national starting pay will average $10.76/hour. We think raising starting pay is a step in the right direction, but co-workers with years of experience may receive no raise at all. We think that investing in co-workers will lead to happier employees, better retention, and higher sales growth. That’s why we’re asking Ikea to offer full-time jobs to every co-worker who wants one and raise pay for all co-workers, not just new hires. We’re calling on our coworkers and customers in the United States and around the world to join us in supporting this petition. We know that when we speak up Ikea listens. Together we’ll convince the company to do what’s right. Thank you for standing with us! Kwesi, Martina, Ruthe Ikea Seattle
    1,891 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Seattle Coworkers
  • Darden: We Want a Seat at the Table
    Having worked at restaurants for 15 years -- including at the Olive Garden for six years -- I know the industry well. Olive Garden’s parent company, Darden Restaurants, can do a lot more to make its restaurants better places to work, but first they need to listen to their employees. For example, in January, the company got rid of automatic gratuity for large parties. It might not seem like much, but when a large party takes up a lot of your shift, those tips make a big difference. Managers told us it was for legal reasons, but I later learned it was because Darden wanted to save a little money on its taxes. I wish the company would've first considered the impact on its servers. We depend on those tips to pay our bills. Another issue is what I call "stuttering breaks." We are told to take a 30 minute break, then asked to wait another hour before returning to work -- all of it off the clock. This seems like a terrible way to run a business, and it takes its toll on staff. How can we make a living when we're not sure how many hours we'll work from week to week? In six years of working at Olive Garden, I've noticed that it's getting harder and harder for employees to make ends meet.  I've had to move back in with my parents in order to afford to finish my college degree in software engineering. I can't imagine how my coworkers with kids -- coworkers who I care deeply about and spend much of my time with -- are able to make it. I want to see the Olive Garden, and all Darden restaurants (which also include LongHorn Steakhouse, Bahama Breeze, Seasons 52, The Capital Grille, Eddie V's, and Yard House) become great places to work.  Darden is such a large employer that if they do more to support employees like me, they can set a standard for the industry -- and they'll get to have their pick of the best employees, too. Now is the time for company leaders to meet with the staff at their restaurants. We all belong to this company and we've got a stake in its survival. At the end of July, longtime Darden CEO Clarence Otis announced that he would be stepping down. As our company faces a leadership vacuum, Wall Street hedge funds are playing a much bigger role in deciding the future of this company. They called for the ouster of Otis and have lobbied for a potential scheme to sell off Darden's assets. These outside firms must consider the concerns and challenges facing the staff at their restaurants. These restaurants are not just assets to be sold off but are how 130,000 workers feed and care for their families.   
 Customers, shareholders, and fellow employees -- please join me in calling on Darden leadership and hedge fund stakeholders to meet with employees and hear our concerns. It's time we had a seat at the table when it comes to deciding the future of this company! Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/people/jeepersmedia/
    7,828 of 8,000 Signatures
    Created by Steve Gazzo
  • We are The Met Opera: Save Our Season!
    A lockout and a cancelled Met Opera season would be devastating to the artists, craftspeople, and other workers who make the Met Opera one of the world's finest cultural institutions. It would also harm businesses in New York City's cultural sector and the Lincoln Center area that depend on the Metropolitan Opera for their livelihoods. We believe the Met’s problems are solvable without a cancelled season. We wish the Met to remain an engine of the NYC cultural and tourism economy—and to continue to thrill audiences young and old for decades to come.
    12,114 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by Nick Porter
  • Living wage rises for Lite n Easy workers
    Lite n Easy workers are paid significantly below food processing industry standards in Australia, and the company has so far refused to offer a guaranteed annual pay rise for more than 1 year. Instead, Lite n Easy are promising to pass on any increases in the minimum wage (if there are any). This has real impacts on our life. Many of us just can't afford to be sick. Many of us don't have anything left after we have paid for rent, bills and food at the end of each week. We don't get to keep enough of the value we create to lead a decent quality of life.
    427 of 500 Signatures
    Created by National Union of Workers General Branch
  • Stop Walmart & Whole Foods from Sourcing Forced Labor
    My name is Olivia Guzman. For 17 years, my husband Fausto and I have been coming to the U.S. each season from our hometown in Mexico as H-2B guestworkers. We worked with thousands of other guestworkers who process and pack seafood for big retailers like Walmart and Whole Foods. The guestworker visa requires us to work for only one employer. The name of our boss is inscribed in our passport, and if we are fired or leave to seek work somewhere else we can be detained and deported by ICE. Our employers paid us a piece rate—by the weight of seafood we cleaned—that often came out to be less than the minimum wage no matter how fast we worked. They housed us in decrepit labor camps on company property where snakes crawled up through cracks in the floor. Bosses and managers surveilled us in the camps, humiliated us, and even physically abused us. To keep us silent, they constantly threatened us with firing, deportation, and blacklisting so we could no longer find work as guestworkers. There comes a time you can’t take the abuse any more, and in spite of the threats, you have to speak up. I did that when I became of member of the National Guestworker Alliance (NGA). I traveled across the Gulf Coast and organized my fellow guestworkers into committees to try to change conditions in the industry. I traveled to Washington, DC, and Mexico City to tell political leaders about the abuse. But when I hosted NGA meetings in my house, the recruiter spied on us. She said we were all trouble makers and threatened to have us blocked from coming back to the United States. And I learned that the threats were real, because this year, my employer blacklisted me in retaliation for my organizing. I was removed from the employment list, accused of being a trouble maker, and blocked from coming back on an H-2B visa to my employer. Walmart says it wants to stop forced labor on its supply chain, but continues to buy from suppliers who abuse guestworkers every day. Whole Foods tells customers all about where its fish were caught, but not that the fish were packed by workers who were trapped in severe labor abuse. Walmart and Whole Foods set the standards that thousands of suppliers follow. My fellow NGA members and I are calling on them to sign the NGA’s Forced Labor Prevention Accord. The Accord is a binding agreement that would ban retaliation and blacklisting, ensure basic labor standards, and create a binding dispute resolution process that includes employers and workers. We are urging retailers to sign the Accord to ensure that their suppliers don’t trap guestworkers in exploitation and forced labor.
    7,610 of 8,000 Signatures
    Created by Olivia Guzman
  • Before Buddy Passes & priority on our own metal!
    As it stands, active non-wholly owned crew members will go after Buddy Passes on stand-by. Be it wholly or non-wholly owned, we all operate under the American banner. It is important to the integrity of the entire operation. Commuting crew members need to get to work so they can operate American flights. In the past American Airlines hasn't had very many non-wholly owned employees, so this hasn't been much of an issue. The new American Airlines now has thousands of non-wholly owned commuting employees. It is to everyone's benefit that working crew go ahead of friends traveling on a pass. This is our Livelihood! Also, having priority on one's own metal has always been accepted as an industry standard. Under the new rules we will lose this. We ask that we retain the right to have priority on our company owned and operated aircraft.
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    Created by Elisabeth Vance Picture