• Park Slope Food Coop: Coop Values are Union Values
    We’re excited that staff are exploring unionizing. The right to have, build, and support a union is an essential human right. Many other food cooperatives in the U.S. are unionized and, at their core, cooperative values are union values. Unions are an organizational tool that can help maintain accountability and serve as a vehicle for workplace democracy and social justice. Unionized workplaces are safer, more fair and transparent workplaces where it is possible to preserve and improve working conditions over many years, regardless of changes in administration and management.
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    Created by HanaKyle Moranz
  • Better Work Conditions
    It can get very hot in the factory in the summer. We all have very active roles and tend to overheat when hard at work. It is to the point of having to stop what you're doing to take a breather, chug water, and wipe all the sweat off your face so you can see. It may not be as bad for some, but especially by the machines that give off extra heat, it can be unbearable at times. According to United States Department of Labor, "As the body continues to store heat, the person begins to lose concentration and has difficulty focusing on a task, may become irritable or sick, and often loses the desire to drink." and "Exposure to heat can also increase the risk of injuries because of sweaty palms, fogged-up safety glasses, dizziness, and burns from hot surfaces or steam."(www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatstress/.) These are some of the risks associated with not having proper cooling in the factory and I have personally experienced and witnessed others with all those symptoms. If there was a way to at least cool down the factory a little, it would create a better work environment and productivity would increase exponentially. Please consider making a change for the better. “UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR.” Occupational Safety and Health Administration, www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatstress/.
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    Created by Taylor Barnes
  • Allow doctors' notes to remove demerit-points from employee records.
    1) We're Not Trying To Re-Create The Wheel: During one of the East side's Attendance Policy meetings just a few days ago, two different co-op employees mentioned their experiences with prior employers who, in fact, used demerit-points systems which allowed employees to clear their respective record(s) of earned sick-time demerit-points when they provided a note from a doctor. Logical. Reasonable. Cooperative. 2) Our Request Is Very Minimal: Let's not get the specific medical-related argument which I'm making here, convoluted and intertwined with the minutia of hypotheticals that could be used as rationales to avoid such a reasonable request. (Such as: Missed plane flights, car trouble, an ill-timed train, etc.) No, what we are talking about here is an incredibly specific situation whereby an hourly employee's doctor has determined that they are not well enough to be in the workplace. Nothing more, and nothing less. Logical. Reasonable. Cooperative. 3) A Demerit System: Our new attendance policy is indeed a demerit system. Using the terminology "no fault" has its value; however, in this instance it is semantics. AND HERE'S WHY: Every point we earn---every single point---ushers us closer to termination. This, in fact, is an objectively perfect example of a demerit-based system. Issuing demerits for doctor-authorized illnesses is essentially blaming employees for something that is not their fault. No one wants to be blamed and held accountable for something that isn't their fault. (If we held our new leadership accountable for the mistakes of previous leadership, that would absolutely not be logical, reasonable, or cooperative.) 4) The Doctor's Note System: In speaking with Willy Street leadership on multiple occasions, it has been alluded to that the GHC doctor's note system (currently in effect) is not reliable in certain capacities. If this is the case, let's simply create a FORM or SET OF CRITERIA which---when completed by the GHC doctor---will satiate our leadership's logistical needs, so that employees can remove demerit-points from their record when possible. This solution is certainly more logical, reasonable, and cooperative than the broadsword approach of forcing demerits onto every hourly employee---regardless of the reason---which ultimately threatens the livelihood of the hourly employee at no-fault of their own. And, once again, we're only talking about doctor-approved illnesses. Nothing more. 5) Sick Work-Force: We've all signed an agreement that said we would not come to work if we were sick. Now, we are told that we will be demerited for calling-in sick. Thus, when we employees signed that agreement, a Catch 22 was created whereby we unknowingly consented to being demerited for being sick. (This is not logical, reasonable, or cooperative.) It seems reasonable to predict that some employees will feel pressured to work when feeling sick under this new attendance policy in order to avoid receiving demerit-points. 6) Minority VS. Majority: It seems as though this specific element to the new attendance policy was created out of frustration in response to our prior lack of a policy. I would simply argue that this frustration—understandable though it is—is not a wholesome platform from which to create new policy. Rather than trying to create a policy that is determined to punitively locate and dismiss the employees who’ve sought to take advantage in the past (i.e., the vast minority), perhaps we could create a system which seeks to protect those employees who’ve served honorably and honestly (i.e. the vast majority). That said, removing the demerit-points with the properly formatted doctor’s note would do just that! WIN—WIN!
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    Created by Noah Hittner Picture
  • Severance for laid-off Tazza D'Oro staff
    My name is Adelaide Smith and I am a former barista and coffee equipment technician at Enrico’s Tazza D’Oro. I started working as a barista at the Highland Park location in April 2017 and have been with the company as it expanded from two cafes, to four cafes and a training lab. When I first started, it was clear that the management structure was somewhat disorganized and not totally functional, but as the new cafes opened, the situation became much worse. Stores have gone months at a time with no manager, so managing responsibilities were piled onto assistant manager and barista workloads. This resulted in day to day operations becoming increasingly stressful for baristas. When that trickled into bad experiences for customers, upper management would show up to hassle the staff about their performance and general attitude, leaving no opportunities for productive discourse. In the context of this managerial chaos, myself and other women consistently received lower scores on job evaluations compared to our few male coworkers, despite working for a company owned by a progressive woman. As a direct result of this disparity, men became eligible for higher raises then women at the barista level. This is a great example of how a well-intentioned feminist can perpetuate gender-based wage disparities in the workplace by failing to implement systems and structures that insure just and equitable working conditions. I don’t believe the owner wants gender-based discrimination to be happening anywhere, but the current structure of her own business makes the issue difficult to address. The owner, Amy Enrico, has a history of retaliating against workers who speak out. In one such instance, where two baristas were fired after bringing up concerns at a staff meeting, the National Labor Relations Board was prepared to back the workers in a federal suit, though Tazza and the employees settled out of court. Throughout the various locations staff have been intimidated and harassed by management in retaliation to collective concerns and issues that baristas had no power over. As the equipment tech and part of the coffee quality control team, I would look into any situations where coffee quality was below our standards. On three specific occasions at the Millvale cafe, management came down on the entire barista staff accusing them of making bad coffee, when the problem was out of their control. I pinpointed the equipment issues that compromised our standards and made the issues known to management, but management continued to hassle the baristas until I was able to fix the issues and show that with properly functioning machinery, the coffee was not just adequate, but better than the other locations. Workers at the Millvale location have been targeted and blamed for the poor performance of the store despite their earnest attempts to make that cafe thrive. When management got onto them about evening shifts taking too long, staff worked off the clock to make sure the cafe was stocked and clean for the morning shift. In April of this year, the Millvale staff was told their jobs had been eliminated and the store was closed with only a day’s notice. Later that day on their social media accounts, Tazza D’Oro claimed they would just be closing the Millvale cafe for only a week and reopening the following Tuesday. After the fired workers organized a picket, the plans to reopen the store were postponed. One of the workers was able to pick up part-time work at another location, while the other four are trying to make it by on unemployment. I know these kinds of issues are commonplace in the restaurant industry, but they don’t have to be! We’re calling on Tazza D’Oro to do the right thing and sit down with us, develop a plan to restructure the company, and pay severance to the laid-off Millvale workers.
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    Created by Adelaide Smith
  • Allow Baristas To Wear Purple And Green
    To Allow More Freedom Of Dresscode Choice. Also, To Allow Us To Express Ourselves With A Little More Color At Work.
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    Created by Krista Rogers Picture
  • Gender Neutral Dress Code
    1. ensures that there’s fair and equal dress code expectations between men and women. 2. prevents unfair discrimination of LGBTQIA employees, especially those whose sex or gender does not fall on the male/ female binary. (Ie: trans, non-binary, and intersex individuals). 3. promotes equal workplace expression for all
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    Created by Max Adler Picture
  • Pay all Uber drivers $15hr
    This company has billions of dollars and spending on other technology. They can pay us the minimum of $15hr with no problem! There customer service department is not the great! There advertising is false and I think they should be held accountable! People deserve paid decent paying wage. As a past driver it's alot dealing with people, traffic and tending to your car, car insurance payments and dealing with disputes. Pay drivers hourly and they need benefits alot drive for 8 hours a day or more!
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    Created by Slava Digriz Picture
  • Tell Netflix CEO Reed Hastings that gender & pregnancy discrimination is wrong
    My name is Lisa, and I'm an actor and a mom who has acted on multiple Netflix shows. Throughout my career, I’ve watched as women across my industry (writers, producers, actors, and tech workers) have been discriminated against as soon as they decide to start a family. That must end. Now. This month, former Netflix manager Tania Zarak bravely spoke out after she was fired by Netflix. When Tania told her boss that she was pregnant, Tania says her boss began isolating her, excluding her from meetings, and even removing her from Netflix shows. After enduring this treatment for weeks, Tania did what we’re supposed to do - complain to HR. But she said Netflix HR notified her boss, who became angry and called her in for a meeting. That’s when Tania’s boss asked when her due date was and encouraged her to quit. Tania refused. Incredibly, the next day, Tania’s boss fired her.[1] THIS IS UNACCEPTABLE. I’ve watched this happen again and again, but didn't expect this from Netflix, the largest and most profitable company in our industry, especially now in the #MeToo #TimesUp era. Despite boasting about its leave policy while recruiting potential employees, Netflix has a track record of inequity on this issue. A former Netflix HR director alleged that as Netflix promotes its leave policy, behind closed doors, Netflix secretly pressures and forces out employees who get pregnant and/or take leave because Netflix HR executives said that “women in particular that take such time are not serious about their careers.”[2] Netflix also previously only provided paid parental leave to some employees, leading workers in its DVD department to launch a public campaign to pressure Netflix to offer paid family leave for all employees.[3] The casts and crews on sets I’ve worked on have been treated with respect and humanity. I want to know that this culture extends to all divisions of a company that I work for, and support with my subscription dollars, as I'm guessing many of you do as well. What happened to Tania is especially awful because Netflix hides its actions behind its family leave policy. It's not enough for Netflix to offer family leave if Netflix then retaliates and fires employees who become pregnant and try to take it! PLEASE SIGN THIS PETITION & SHOW NETFLIX THAT WE STAND WITH TANIA AND WORKING MOMS WHO STAND UP TO DISCRIMINATION. [1] https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6882153/Former-Netflix-manager-39-sues-streaming-giant-claiming-fired-pregnant.html [2] https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/netflix-settles-executive-claiming-widespread-sexual-harassment-1050313 [3] https://www.coworker.org/petitions/netfix-extend-paid-parental-leave-policy-to-all-employees
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    Created by Lisa
  • Uber: Give Drivers Their Fair Share
    My name is Mostafa Maklad and I have been an Uber driver since 2014. I’ve given 8,000 rides, usually driving between 50-60 hours a week — though sometimes it’s 80. The living hourly wage — the amount of money one needs to earn to afford housing, food, medical care and transportation — is about $20 for a single adult in San Francisco; I routinely make half that. Because of this, I joined the international Uber Shut Down on May 8th. Together, drivers made history. Rideshare drivers in six countries across the world organized a global day of action protesting Uber's IPO. In the U.S., over 10 cities joined in including Philadelphia, Boston, Atlanta, Chicago, New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. Drivers in every city stood together to call on Uber to pay us a living wage and treat us with dignity and respect. Uber drivers provide services that so many rely on every day to move through their lives — rides to school, work, medical appointments, social events and safe passage back home. As drivers, we pour ourselves into our work, doing one of the most dangerous jobs in our society to ensure that every passenger arrives safely at their destination. But Uber excludes us from basic worker protections. Without these protections, we face low wages and labor abuses. We have no way to organize and Uber denies us crucial benefits like health insurance, disability, overtime or workers comp. We face unsafe working conditions and have no recourse when we're deactivated. Drivers take all the risk, executives get all the reward. But now, we are calling on Uber to give us our fair share: - Living wage: Uber must pay drivers a livable hourly rate (after expenses). - Transparency: Clear policies on wages, tips, fare breakdowns and deactivations. - Benefits: Such as disability, workers comp, retirement, health care, death benefits, and paid time off. - Voice at work: A recognized independent worker organization, the freedom to stand together without fear of retaliation and a fair and transparent process for deactivations. Sign on now to stand with drivers!
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    Created by Gig Workers Rising
  • Drivers Need a Living Wage
    My name is Mostafa Maklad and I am an Uber driver in San Francisco. I've been a driver for 3 years and have given over 8000 rides on Uber. Uber is about to launch their IPO, which will put billions in the pockets of executives. But I can't help but wonder: what will drivers get? Uber and Lyft drivers provide services that so many people rely on every day to move through their lives — rides to school, work, medical appointments, social events and safe passage back home. As drivers, we pour ourselves into our work, doing one of the most dangerous jobs in our society to ensure that every passenger arrives safely at their destination. But Uber denies rideshare drivers like me a living wage by constantly slashing rates and pocketing the difference. Drivers should make a living wage. California has always been a leader in protecting workers and now it is time for California to take the lead again - drivers need a living wage.
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    Created by Gig Workers Rising
  • Plastic Bag Ban
    Because plastic bags and plastic, in general, are having a severely detrimental effect on the earth's ecosystems. We can all do our part of course in refusing plastic but our actions only go so far. We must demand businesses and corporations in leading the way to more clean energy and eco-friendly alternatives.
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    Created by Stefan Trimm
  • The People Say: Do Better, Penn
    As prospective Penn students, we stand in solidarity with our fellow students who attend the School District of Philadelphia and declare that every student deserves an education. We know the University does not pay property taxes despite owning 10% of all the land in Philadelphia, and we call on the administration to contribute Payments in Lieu of Taxes. The current “services in lieu of taxes” are inadequate and do not help solve the crisis of secular underfunding when lead and asbestos from crumbling structures poison children, when students lack access to full-time nurses, and when students have little hope to learn and grow in overcrowded classrooms stocked with outdated textbooks. As prospective Penn students, we know that this campus cannot operate without its workers. Even one hour of Quaker Days programming could not exist without the hard work of the campus staff. This work is not properly recognized or compensated. We demand that the University be responsible in ensuring that all workers, subcontracted or not, receive a livable wage and comprehensive health benefits. As prospective Penn students, we demand that the University align its investments with the values it claims to uphold and stop investing in the fossil fuel industry—an industry that spreads false science, contributes to climate change, buys politicians, and takes advantage of marginalized communities, including those enmeshed with Penn in West Philadelphia and along the Schuylkill River. The University of Pennsylvania should divest its endowment from the fossil fuel industry and reinvest in clean energy and just climate solutions. The University’s commitment to climate solutions can only be taken seriously when it addresses its largest source of carbon emissions: its investments. Whereas, Penn provides opportunities for symbolic aid to the public schools of Philadelphia, and we recognize the insufficiency of these forms in the gentrifying Penn Alexander School, in the bussing of untrained undergraduate and graduate students to tutor after-school students who lack basic necessities during the school day, and in anything short of capital support in the form of PILOTs. Whereas, Penn offers educational and fair wages to some, yet it knowingly subcontracts to third parties so as to pay poverty wages and poverty benefits to the workers who make the campus run. Penn must treat its employees with respect in its workplaces and its payrolls. Whereas, Penn’s Climate Action Plan, green space, assorted LEED certifications, recycling bins, and individual reforms are vain so long as it refuses to recognize and resolve the largest chunk of its carbon footprint: investments in fossil fuels. We, the undersigned, ask the University to adhere to our demands and thereby cohere with its motto, “leges sine moribus vanae”—laws without morals are meaningless.
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    Created by Student Labor Action Project