• City of Madison Workers Demand Coronavirus Protections
    With more cases of coronavirus reported in Wisconsin and Dane County, Governor Evers has declared a state of emergency. The University of Wisconsin has halted all in-person instruction; K-12 schools will close for the next four weeks; sports seasons have halted; and other public gatherings have been cancelled. What will happen with City workers? City of Madison employees have been encouraged to work from home and warned that any personal travel may result in quarantine for 14 days, which will be deducted from the employee’s sick or other leave time. For most City employees, there is no opportunity to work from home: bus drivers, firefighters, clerks, mechanics, parking attendants, and many others have jobs that must be physically present to perform. This means City employees must choose between coming to work sick or potentially losing income or our jobs. Regardless of City Agency, position or union, City workers have a common interest in making sure our employer handles this crisis properly and doesn’t place the burden on the shoulders of employees as we take care of ourselves and our families.
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    Created by Madison City Worker
  • Chili's: Provide Paid Sick Days!
    People who work at Chili's deserve paid sick days, especially with the rapid spreading of the coronavirus. As a large chain restaurant, Chili's unfortunately has a troubled history of public health issues, having been sued by customers for salmonella, food-poisoning, among other health-related lawsuits. This is an opportunity for Chili's to finally be on the right side of history by leading the industry along with Olive Garden on public health issues by providing paid sick days to their employees.
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    Created by ROC United Picture
  • Denny's: Provide Paid Sick Days
    People who work at Denny's deserve paid sick days, especially with the rapid spreading of the coronavirus. Denny's disproportionately serves the elderly population, meaning if their workforce contracts the coronavirus, the company has a higher likelihood of spreading the virus to those with weakened immune systems. This is a public health issue! Denny's do your part and follow Olive Garden's lead in providing paid sick days to your employees.
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  • IHOP & Applebee's: Provide Paid Sick Days!
    People at Applebee's deserve paid sick days, especially with the rapid spreading of the coronavirus. The parent company is one the largest in the restaurant industry, employing tens of thousands of people with locations all over America and abroad. A significant percentage of their restaurants are franchised with different policies and rules for each store. Corporate stepping in and requiring paid sick days at all franchised & corporate-owned locations is the quickest and most effective way to protect their employees and be a leader in helping curb the spread of the virus.
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    Created by ROC United Picture
  • Coronavirus: Whole Foods Workers Need Paid Sick Hours!
    Grocery workers around the country frequently work while sick as they can't afford to miss a single day of work because companies refuse to pay a living wage. This causes employees further suffering and exposes co-workers, food, and the public to potential infection. Jeff Bezos is the richest man on the planet and is more than able to provide an immediate expansion of Paid Sick Hours to protect Whole Foods employees and the public. Bezos has yet to provide his employees at Whole Foods with anything to cope with the recent outbreak. Bezos even had the audacity to cut healthcare benefits for nearly 2,000 Whole Foods employees at the beginning of the year. What Bezos makes in one day could cover a week of Paid Sick Time for all Whole Foods employees. Some co-workers at Amazon have already been told to work from home and other companies have even taken some appropriate action. Whole Foods needs to take this health crisis seriously and stop worrying about public perception and putting profits ahead of safety. We handle the food everyone consumes, push the shopping carts everyone touches, collect the baskets everyone carries, and count the cash everyone spends. It's time Whole Foods stops endangering its employees and the public. We need Paid Sick Hours NOW. Members of the public can call/email: Patrick Bradley, SOPAC Regional President: 818-501-8484 Rick Bonin, North Atlantic Regional President: [email protected] Scott Allshouses, Mid-Atlantic Regional President: [email protected] Omar Gaye, Northern California Regional President: 770-638-5884 Bill Jordan, Rocky Mountain Regional President: 818-501-8484 Angela Lorenzen, Pacific Northwest Regional President: 425-957-6700 Juan Nuñez, Florida Regional President: 954-489-2022 Matt Ray, Southwest Regional President: [email protected] David Schwartz, Midwest Region Regional President: 312-799-5637 Nicole Wescoe, Northeast Regional President: 301-984-2058 You can and should also call the Customer Service line at: 844-WFM-TALK (844-936-8255) and World Headquarters 512-477-4455 512-477-5566 - Voicemail 512-482-7000 - Fax Tell Whole Foods to take the safety of the public and ours seriously by demanding Jeff Bezos provide us with more Paid Sick Hours: In Solidarity, Whole Worker Organizing Committee
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  • Demand gig economy companies give paid sick time off during coronavirus
    Everyday, I have 20-30 people come into my car - with all their germs. While other workers who are exposed at work have things like paid time off and healthcare, I have no protection. Under recently passed legislation in California, gig companies are supposed to guarantee gig workers access to paid sick days, but the companies have refused to do so. Gig companies, like Uber, Lyft and DoorDash, irresponsibly deny their drivers basic protections like paid sick time off. Anyone can get sick from coronavirus, but because drivers like me don’t have paid sick time, I can’t go to the doctor or take time off without losing precious income. If I don’t work, I can’t afford my rent. My choices are either to continue working while sick, just so I can survive to the next week, or not work and fall behind on bills and rent. Drivers are always forced to choose between these two impossible options because Uber and Lyft shrug responsibility for ensuring everyone's safety. Even in the face of a global pandemic where the best protection we all have collectively is limiting exposure and ensuring access to the medical care we deserve, Uber and Lyft are doing what they have always done: creating unsafe and unfair conditions and leaving drivers with the responsibility and expense to deal with the repercussions. As a driver, my whole job is to keep people safe — to get my passengers from point A to point B safely. Right now, I am doing everything in my power to take safety precautions, like wiping down my car regularly, but it's not enough. All workers need and deserve paid time off and healthcare all of the time, but this pandemic shows that we need it especially right now, when our communities are at risk of infection. If these companies are not held accountable to take action immediately, they are putting drivers and all the riders we transport at risk. It’s a potential public health crisis, and companies like Uber and Lyft have a real and urgent responsibility to protect the health of society at large. - Yash A. Driver and leader with Gig Workers Rising
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    Created by Gig Workers Rising
  • DCH1 Amazonians United Petition for Equal PTO & Meeting with Daniel Reyes
    Amazon is treating delivery station warehouse workers like second-class employees. We work hard & put our bodies on the line to rush packages out to customers in 1 day, make Amazon one of the biggest companies in the world, and make Jeff Bezos the wealthiest man in the world. But we are not given the same Paid Time Off benefits that are provided to other part-time employees. In February, DCH1 Amazonians United collected and submitted a petition demanding 1) equality with other Amazon Part-Time Associates who receive PTO and Paid Vacation Time, and 2) a meeting between DCH1 Amazonians United and Daniel Reyes our regional manager, to address this concern. We submitted our petition with 250 signatures from DCH1 workers to our site lead Domonic Wilkerson- he told us that he met with Daniel Reyes, they reviewed our petition, and that they were not going to meet with us. Amazon claims to have an open door policy, but when 250 associates ask for a meeting with one of our managers, they refuse. As workers that make Amazon what it is, we deserve to be addressed with respect, and for management to engage in good faith discussion with our group. Please sign this petition to demand that Daniel Reyes meet with DCH1 Amazonians United, and support our fight to get equal PTO for all Amazon warehouse workers!
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    Created by DCH1 Amazonians United
  • Amazon, give us fair compensation, a fair workplace, and fair accommodations
    Amazon Logistics Workers in NYC Deserve a Raise Amazon is one of the richest companies in the world, run by the richest man alive. They currently pay workers at DBK1 the bare minimum that is required by law. Amazon workers should be paid fairly for the value they create. Paid Time Off All DBK1 workers are promised Paid Personal Time and Paid Vacation Time when offered the job. Though the employee handbook (the so-called “Owner's Manual”) makes this promise, these benefits are denied to the vast majority of DBK1 workers. Amazon workers should be guaranteed the Paid Time Off they are promised upon beginning their employment at the company. Appeals Process At many Amazon facilities, workers have a procedure by which they can appeal final warnings or terminations. However, at delivery stations such as DBK1, workers are denied this minimum level of job security. Workers should have clear access to their verbal warnings and write up histories. They deserve to be protected from unjust and arbitrary discipline and termination and should have the same appeals process as other facilities. Paid Safe and Sick Leave By law, employers in New York City must provide workers with paid safe and sick leave. DBK1 has denied workers this right since it opened eight months ago. In response to a petition drive by workers, management has recently committed to complying with the law and crediting workers for their earned sick time. However, management has not provided a timeline of when this will happen or committed to rehiring workers fired for absences. They must follow through on their commitment, enable workers to easily and readily use safe and sick leave immediately, and rehire employees unjustly terminated for missing work while sick. Signed, Amazonians United New York City
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    Created by Amazonians United New York City Picture
  • Allow doctors' notes to remove demerit-points from employee records.
    1) We're Not Trying To Re-Create The Wheel: During one of the East side's Attendance Policy meetings just a few days ago, two different co-op employees mentioned their experiences with prior employers who, in fact, used demerit-points systems which allowed employees to clear their respective record(s) of earned sick-time demerit-points when they provided a note from a doctor. Logical. Reasonable. Cooperative. 2) Our Request Is Very Minimal: Let's not get the specific medical-related argument which I'm making here, convoluted and intertwined with the minutia of hypotheticals that could be used as rationales to avoid such a reasonable request. (Such as: Missed plane flights, car trouble, an ill-timed train, etc.) No, what we are talking about here is an incredibly specific situation whereby an hourly employee's doctor has determined that they are not well enough to be in the workplace. Nothing more, and nothing less. Logical. Reasonable. Cooperative. 3) A Demerit System: Our new attendance policy is indeed a demerit system. Using the terminology "no fault" has its value; however, in this instance it is semantics. AND HERE'S WHY: Every point we earn---every single point---ushers us closer to termination. This, in fact, is an objectively perfect example of a demerit-based system. Issuing demerits for doctor-authorized illnesses is essentially blaming employees for something that is not their fault. No one wants to be blamed and held accountable for something that isn't their fault. (If we held our new leadership accountable for the mistakes of previous leadership, that would absolutely not be logical, reasonable, or cooperative.) 4) The Doctor's Note System: In speaking with Willy Street leadership on multiple occasions, it has been alluded to that the GHC doctor's note system (currently in effect) is not reliable in certain capacities. If this is the case, let's simply create a FORM or SET OF CRITERIA which---when completed by the GHC doctor---will satiate our leadership's logistical needs, so that employees can remove demerit-points from their record when possible. This solution is certainly more logical, reasonable, and cooperative than the broadsword approach of forcing demerits onto every hourly employee---regardless of the reason---which ultimately threatens the livelihood of the hourly employee at no-fault of their own. And, once again, we're only talking about doctor-approved illnesses. Nothing more. 5) Sick Work-Force: We've all signed an agreement that said we would not come to work if we were sick. Now, we are told that we will be demerited for calling-in sick. Thus, when we employees signed that agreement, a Catch 22 was created whereby we unknowingly consented to being demerited for being sick. (This is not logical, reasonable, or cooperative.) It seems reasonable to predict that some employees will feel pressured to work when feeling sick under this new attendance policy in order to avoid receiving demerit-points. 6) Minority VS. Majority: It seems as though this specific element to the new attendance policy was created out of frustration in response to our prior lack of a policy. I would simply argue that this frustration—understandable though it is—is not a wholesome platform from which to create new policy. Rather than trying to create a policy that is determined to punitively locate and dismiss the employees who’ve sought to take advantage in the past (i.e., the vast minority), perhaps we could create a system which seeks to protect those employees who’ve served honorably and honestly (i.e. the vast majority). That said, removing the demerit-points with the properly formatted doctor’s note would do just that! WIN—WIN!
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  • AMC is a large company with revenue to AFFORD to PAY EVERY INDIVIDUAL employee O/T H/P sick leave
    We do the same, if not more, than management. So how are they paid time and a half on holidays while other AMC employees don't receive holiday pay? They've told me they're not required to by law. I looked into it myself and found out that the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) exempts us (hourly crew) from its overtime requirements “any employee employed by an establishment which is a motion picture theater.” 29 U.S.C. §213(b)(27). The FLSA was enacted in 1936. Movie theaters have drastically change since then -- so have the job requirements and daily job duties of movie theater employees. For example, not all movie theaters only show movies anymore -- they have full service dine-in restaurants that still serve food whether or not you buy a movie ticket. I believe that the movie theater exemption should be taken out of the FLSA in order to truly protect the everyday employee, but even so, that doesn't mean that AMC can't provide greater benefits for its hourly employees right now. I believe companies such as AMC, who make well over a billion dollars in revenue a year (5 billion reported in 2016), can afford to pay the new era of movie theater employees overtime, as well as holiday and sick leave like salaried employees already receive.
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  • Matchbox: Respect Your Workers Rights!
    We would like fellow restaurant professionals (front and back of house) regardless of nation of origin, status, race, gender, age, or identity to know that you are not alone. You deserve dignity and respect at work: the law is on your side. Stand together and make your voices heard. We stand with you. (Nos gustaría que los profesionales de los restaurantes (igual los de enfrente y los de la cocina) sin embargo de su nación de origen, estatus, raza, genero, edad o identidad que sepan: usted no está solo. Todos merecen dignidad y respeto en el trabajo: la ley está de su lado. Permanezcan unidos y levanten sus voces. Nosotros estamos unidos con ustedes.) The company has declined to hear us. Please read our testimonies, and sign and share our petition in support. Thank you. (La compañía se ha negado a escucharnos. Por favor lea nuestros testimonios, y firme y comparta nuestra petición en apoyo.) Testimonies (Testimonios) ---------------------------------------- Maria D. I worked for the company for two years as a busser. I was paid $5.00 per hour plus $15-$20 in tips. This was my compensation regardless of whether I worked half day or a full day. When I was four months pregnant I was asked to move heavy boxes. I spoke up to let them know that those boxes were too heavy for me that far along in my pregnancy. They responded forcing me to move them and by shortening my schedule to two hours a week. The entire time I worked there they never allowed me to have rest or food breaks. I was never granted a paid sick day. (Trabajé para la compañía durante dos años como busser. Me pagaron $5.00 por hora más $15- $20 en propinas por día. Esta fue mi compensación independientemente de si trabajé medio día o un día completo. Cuando tenía cuatro meses de embarazo, me pidieron que moviera unas cajas pesadas. Les hice saber que esas cajas eran demasiado pesadas para mí a esa altura de mi embarazo. Respondieron con obligarme a moverlas y cortaron mi horario a dos horas a la semana. Todo el tiempo que trabajé allí nunca me permitieron descanso ni tiempo de comer. Nunca me concedieron un día de enfermedad pagado.) ---------------------------------- Maria O. I experienced a lot of discrimination up to and including verbal and physical abuse. On one occasion, I was working on the line with one other coworker making pizzas. The chef joined us on the line to help us because it got busy all of the sudden. He put the pizza into the oven using the wooden pizza peel and proceeded to throw it at me. He was obviously upset, so I just moved into a corner and kept trying to work. He would refer to me as a useless. When I was pregnant and I asked for a day off they would give me an unpaid day off and then take an additional day off my schedule for the week. On another occasion I was reprimanded for something I hadn't done. Because I was pregnant my blood pressure got so high I ended up in the hospital. Not once during my entire pregnancy was I allowed a break to eat. I honestly believe that the company takes advantage of people's need to work and discriminates based on gender and nation of origin. I started earning $11.00 per hour. I worked there for six years and never saw a pay increase, nor had a paid sick day. (Experimenté mucha discriminación e incluso abuso verbal y físico. En una ocasión, estaba trabajando en la línea con otra compañera haciendo pizza y el chef ejecutivo se unió a nosotros porque se puso muy ocupado de repente. Despues de haber metido la pizza al horno él procedió a tirarme la tabla que se usa para meter la pizza al horno. Porque el estaba obviamente muy molesto yo solamente me mudé a una esquina y seguí intentando trabajar. Él rutinariamente se referiría a mí como una babosada. Cuando estaba embarazada, si pedía un día libre para una cita con el médico, me daban un día libre sin pagar. Luego tomarían un día adicional de mi horario para la semana. Lo que de hecho me dejó dos días sin trabajo y pago en una semana. En otra ocasión, fui reprendida por algo que no había hecho. Debido a que estaba embarazada, mi presión arterial se elevó tanto que terminé en el hospital. Ni una sola vez durante todo mi embarazo se me permitió tomarme un descanso. Sinceramente, creo que la empresa aprovecha la necesidad de las personas de trabajar y discrimina en función del género y la nación de origen. Empeze ganando $11.00. Trabajé allí durante seis años y nunca vi un aumento en salario, ni tuve un día de enfermedad pagado.) ------------------------------------------- Santos M. I suffer from a disease that occasionally makes my hands and feet swell and causes a lot of pain. They never understood that some days the pain and swelling was so great I could not walk or hold anything without excessive pain. Instead of allowing me the time to treat the swelling so I could work better, the chef would pressure me to work faster while insulting me for my symptoms. I worked there for five years. The last day I worked there was because the chef told me I was of no use to him because of my disease. He told me to go home and he never wanted to see me again. (Yo padezco de una enfermedad que ocasionalmente hincha las manos y los pies y causa mucho dolor. Nunca entendieron que algunos días la inflamación era tan grande que no podía caminar ni sostener nada sin un dolor excesivo. En lugar de darme el tiempo para tratar la inflamación para poder trabajar mejor, el chef me presionaría para que trabaje más rápido mientras me insultaba por mis síntomas. Trabajé allí cinco años. El último día que trabajé allí fue porque el chef me dijo que no le servía para nada debido a mi enfermedad. Me dijo que me fuera a casa y que nunca más me quería volver a ver.)
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  • Starbucks: Dads need time to bond with their babies too!
    I’ve been a barista at Starbucks for nearly 4 years in multiple states and currently work in Wilsonville, Oregon. My wife is due to give birth to our first baby in less than 2 weeks. For so many soon-to-be fathers, feeling anxious is normal, but I’m even more nervous because we don’t have access to any paid parental leave. In order to help support my wife during her pregnancy, I used up some of my vacation and sick time, which is now running short. Currently, I have a week and a half left of vacation or sick time which I expect to use after our delivery. Our benefits allowed us the family planning financial assistance necessary for infertility treatment, but now the ability to be present during the most crucial stage of my family’s development is in jeopardy. As a single income family with a new infant, we simply cannot afford to take unpaid time off. The current partner benefits system works against expecting parents, something we have unfortunately found out the hard way. The part time disability that my wife and I pay into does not allow any paid time off to care for my wife after birth, because pregnancy is considered as a preexisting condition. As our child is scheduled to arrive during the holiday season, the ability to be a part of the postpartum process is even more worrisome. I made the choice to work at Starbucks after a 17 year long career because I have received great benefits, including health insurance. I’m a partner and a shareholder in the company - but when it comes to paid family leave, it’s as if my contributions and sacrifices to Starbucks don't matter. It is incredibly frustrating to know that new fathers who work in the corporate office receive 12 weeks paid parental leave - time that would make a world of difference for my family. These rights should be offered to every partner, in every retail store, and would impress upon the company an even more supportive and fulfilling workplace. I’m sharing my story because I know that it’s not just me who needs to be able to take paid parental leave - I’ve talked to so many other men at work who are shocked to find out that we don’t receive any paid time to be there when we have children. The time of fathers and husbands to only be financial contributors has come and gone. My desire to be an equal part of the rearing of my children and caretaker seem to be a concept that Starbucks has yet to consider. For relationships like ours, that don’t have assistance from family and friends, we equally rely on each other in times of health and hardships. Currently, Starbucks employees who work in the corporate office receive 12 weeks of paid parental leave, and birthing mothers receive an additional 6 weeks (18 weeks total). For those of us who work in the stores, birthing mothers and adoptive parents receive 6 weeks paid parental leave - but dads are completely left out - we don’t receive any time at all.
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    Created by Ryk and PL+US